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Napoleon Bonaparte

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Full Bibliographic Citation

MLA

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Napoleon Bonaparte.” SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. 2005. Web. 16 Jul. 2014.

The Chicago Manual of Style

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Napoleon Bonaparte.” SparkNotes LLC. 2005. http://www.sparknotes.com/biography/napoleon/ (accessed July 16, 2014).

APA

SparkNotes Editors. (2005). SparkNote on Napoleon Bonaparte. Retrieved July 16, 2014, from http://www.sparknotes.com/biography/napoleon/

In Text Citation

MLA

“Their conversation is awkward, especially when she mentions Wickham, a subject Darcy clearly wishes to avoid” (SparkNotes Editors).

APA

“Their conversation is awkward, especially when she mentions Wickham, a subject Darcy clearly wishes to avoid” (SparkNotes Editors, 2005).

Footnote

The Chicago Manual of Style

Chicago requires the use of footnotes, rather than parenthetical citations, in conjunction with a list of works cited when dealing with literature.

1 SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Napoleon Bonaparte.” SparkNotes LLC. 2005. http://www.sparknotes.com/biography/napoleon/ (accessed July 16, 2014).


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Wrong date.

by kbbaby224, November 18, 2013

It wasn't in 1814 that he abdicated this throne. He abdicated his throne in 1815

response to abdication

by brianohhh, November 22, 2013

To the comment above.
Actually - Napoleon did sign an abdication on April 4, 1814, after the Allies ganged up on him and invaded France successfully. In 1815 he was sent to St.Helena after he had escaped from Elba and was defeated at Waterloo.

Waterloo Error

by brianohhh, November 22, 2013

The article makes a massive and typical blunder in stating Napoleon fought 'the British army' at Waterloo. In fact Wellington's army was made up of various nationalities; British, Dutch, Belgian, various German states. Of the 68,000 strong army of Wellington, just over 24,000 were actually British.

See all 6 readers' notes   →

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