Skip over navigation

For Whom The Bell Tolls

Ernest Hemingway

Chapters Fourteen–Seventeen

Chapters Eight–Thirteen

Chapters Fourteen–Seventeen, page 2

page 1 of 2

Summary: Chapter Fourteen

By the time Pilar, Maria, and Robert Jordan return to camp, it has already begun to snow. Pablo predicts that a great deal of snow will fall. Inwardly, Robert Jordan briefly feels enraged and disgusted by his mission and the whole war, but he quickly calms down. Pablo tells Robert Jordan that he used to take care of horses for Finito, Pilar’s former companion, who was a bullfighter. Pilar tells a story about a time when one bull hit Finito particularly hard during a fight. Finito made a scene at a dinner in his honor that was held after the bullfight. That winter, Finito died.

After Pilar finishes her story, Rafael returns from his watch and makes a report. Fernando volunteers to take Robert Jordan to pick up Anselmo, who is watching the road.

Summary: Chapter Fifteen

Despite the snowstorm, Anselmo still mans his post. He watches Fascist soldiers who are headquartered inside a sawmill across the road. He realizes that the soldiers are poor peasants just like him. He remembers the first time he killed a man, which was during a raid that Pablo organized.

Meanwhile, inside the sawmill, a corporal and three Fascist soldiers talk about the snow and the superiority of the Fascists’ air power. Outside, Anselmo is cold and lonely and misses praying. Finally, Robert Jordan and Fernando arrive and escort Anselmo back to the camp. Robert Jordan is happy that Anselmo has stayed at his post through the snowstorm.

Summary: Chapter Sixteen

Back in the cave, Pilar tells Robert Jordan that El Sordo stopped by and then left to find more horses. Maria attentively waits on Robert Jordan, who is pleased and touched that El Sordo has brought him whiskey. Pablo, drinking in the corner, alternately insults Robert Jordan and voices mournful thoughts. In particular, Pablo expresses regret for the massacre of the Fascists in his hometown.

To defuse the tension, Primitivo and the other men ask Robert Jordan questions about his job teaching Spanish and about American social policy. Robert Jordan tries to provoke Pablo into a fight, thinking it would be an opportune moment to kill Pablo and not have the other men turn against him. Pablo refuses to take the bait, however. Agustín hits Pablo several times in the face and calls him a horse-lover, but Pablo remains calm. Finally, Pablo goes out to check on his horses.

More Help

Previous Next

Readers' Notes allow users to add their own analysis and insights to our SparkNotes—and to discuss those ideas with one another. Have a novel take or think we left something out? Add a Readers' Note!

Follow Us