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A Farewell to Arms

Ernest Hemingway

Contents

Rinaldi

Rinaldi

Rinaldi’s character serves an important function in A Farewell to Arms. He dominates an array of minor male characters who embody the kind of virile, competent, and good-natured masculinity that, for better or worse, so much of Hemingway’s fiction celebrates. Rinaldi is an unbelievable womanizer, professing to be in love with Catherine at the beginning of the novel but claiming soon thereafter to be relieved that he is not, like Henry, saddled with the complicated emotional baggage that the love of a woman entails. Considering Rinaldi’s frequent visits to the local whorehouses, Henry later muses that his friend has most likely succumbed to syphilis. While this registers as an unpleasant end, it is presented with an air of detached likelihood rather than fervent moralizing. It is, in other words, not punishment for a man’s bad behavior but rather the consequence of a man behaving as a man—living large, living boldly, and being true to himself.

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RINALDI QUIZ

When describing his experience in the war, Henry portrays himself as motivated primarily by ___.
Duty
Love
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Rinaldi QUIZ

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The Ending.

by BubblyBaby5832, August 04, 2012

The ending was good, but depressing.

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8 out of 29 people found this helpful

Okay.

by doctordepp, October 14, 2013

I personally thought it was okay.
It only got interesting for me towards the end.

Boring in the beginning, considerable and touching in the second part

by MrsMojito1, November 06, 2014

I personally found the first half of the book a bit monotonous, and Hemingways distanced writing almost glacial. The second half of the book, particularly after the beginning of the Italian retreat, was far more involving with interesting reflections on war, life and death.
The last part made me shed a few tears, it was impetuous and expressed Henry´s desperation, and eventually human desperation, perfectly. I´m quite ambivalent about the book, but the last chapters are definitely worth reading!

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