Frankenstein

by: Mary Shelley

Chapters 3-5

1
“My children,” she said, “my firmest hopes of future happiness were placed on the prospect of your union.”
2
Such were the professor’s words—rather let me say such the words of the fate—enounced to destroy me.
3
Two years passed in this manner, during which I paid no visit to Geneva, but was engaged, heart and soul, in the pursuit of some discoveries which I hoped to make.
4
After days and nights of incredible labour and fatigue, I succeeded in discovering the cause of generation and life; nay, more, I became capable of bestowing animation on lifeless matter.
5
I saw the dull yellow eye of the monster open; it breathed hard and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.