Great Expectations

by: Charles Dickens

Chapters 36–37

1

“Now, that handsome sum of money, Pip, is your own. It is a present to you on this day, in earnest of your expectations. And at the rate of that handsome sum of money per annum, and at no higher rate, you are to live until the donor of the whole appears.”

2

“Choose your bridge, Mr. Pip,” returned Wemmick, “and take a walk upon your bridge, and pitch your money into the Thames over the centre arch of your bridge, and you know the end of it. Serve a friend with it, and you may know the end of it too—but it’s a less pleasant and profitable end.”

3

You hit the nail on the head Mr. Pip, I’ll put on my considering cap, and I think all you want to do, may be done by degrees. Skiffins (that’s her brother) is an accountant and agent. I’ll look him up and go to work for you.