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Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

The development of Jane Eyre’s character is central to the novel. From the beginning, Jane possesses a sense of her self-worth and dignity, a commitment to justice and principle, a trust in God, and a passionate disposition. Her integrity is continually tested over the course of the novel, and Jane must learn to balance the frequently conflicting aspects of herself so as to find contentment.

An orphan since early childhood, Jane feels exiled and ostracized at the beginning of the novel, and the cruel treatment she receives from her Aunt Reed and her cousins only exacerbates her feeling of alienation. Afraid that she will never find a true sense of home or community, Jane feels the need to belong somewhere, to find “kin,” or at least “kindred spirits.” This desire tempers her equally intense need for autonomy and freedom.

In her search for freedom, Jane also struggles with the question of what type of freedom she wants. While Rochester initially offers Jane a chance to liberate her passions, Jane comes to realize that such freedom could also mean enslavement—by living as Rochester’s mistress, she would be sacrificing her dignity and integrity for the sake of her feelings. St. John Rivers offers Jane another kind of freedom: the freedom to act unreservedly on her principles. He opens to Jane the possibility of exercising her talents fully by working and living with him in India. Jane eventually realizes, though, that this freedom would also constitute a form of imprisonment, because she would be forced to keep her true feelings and her true passions always in check.

Charlotte Brontë may have created the character of Jane Eyre as a means of coming to terms with elements of her own life. Much evidence suggests that Brontë, too, struggled to find a balance between love and freedom and to find others who understood her. At many points in the book, Jane voices the author’s then-radical opinions on religion, social class, and gender.

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JANE EYRE QUIZ

Why won’t Jane live with Rochester as his mistress?
She doesn’t love Rochester.
Rochester doesn’t respect her.
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Hard Timing Following? Try this!

by Heaven_Smee, April 16, 2013

When reading this imagine that you are Jane Erye. Try and relate yourself to the situation that the character is going through. That way you can follow the mindset of the book.

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30 out of 47 people found this helpful

amazing

by anna5000, November 21, 2014

amazing
jane eyre is brill

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8 out of 38 people found this helpful

WOMEN

by char_ellzabeth, March 23, 2015

In Jane Eyre it is certain that the number of women over rides the number of men; however, in the novel you will notice that mothers are limited. There are adoptive motherly figures, for example Miss Temple and Mrs Fairfax, but the only true mother that we see (alive) is Mrs Reed, and quite simply - she is not a good mother! On the next read, look at how little mothers appear - and think/link this back to Brontë's life and her motherly influences.

Hope this gives you an extra point to look at and write on! x

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10 out of 11 people found this helpful

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Jane Eyre (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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