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St. John Rivers

St. John Rivers

St. John Rivers

St. John Rivers

St. John Rivers is a foil to Edward Rochester. Whereas Rochester is passionate, St. John is austere and ambitious. Jane often describes Rochester’s eyes as flashing and flaming, whereas she constantly associates St. John with rock, ice, and snow. Marriage with Rochester represents the abandonment of principle for the consummation of passion, but marriage to St. John would mean sacrificing passion for principle. When he invites her to come to India with him as a missionary, St. John offers Jane the chance to make a more meaningful contribution to society than she would as a housewife. At the same time, life with St. John would mean life without true love, in which Jane’s need for spiritual solace would be filled only by retreat into the recesses of her own soul. Independence would be accompanied by loneliness, and joining St. John would require Jane to neglect her own legitimate needs for love and emotional support. Her consideration of St. John’s proposal leads Jane to understand that, paradoxically, a large part of one’s personal freedom is found in a relationship of mutual emotional dependence.

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ST. JOHN RIVERS QUIZ

Why won’t Jane live with Rochester as his mistress?
She doesn’t love Rochester.
Rochester doesn’t respect her.
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Hard Timing Following? Try this!

by Heaven_Smee, April 16, 2013

When reading this imagine that you are Jane Erye. Try and relate yourself to the situation that the character is going through. That way you can follow the mindset of the book.

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30 out of 47 people found this helpful

amazing

by anna5000, November 21, 2014

amazing
jane eyre is brill

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8 out of 38 people found this helpful

WOMEN

by char_ellzabeth, March 23, 2015

In Jane Eyre it is certain that the number of women over rides the number of men; however, in the novel you will notice that mothers are limited. There are adoptive motherly figures, for example Miss Temple and Mrs Fairfax, but the only true mother that we see (alive) is Mrs Reed, and quite simply - she is not a good mother! On the next read, look at how little mothers appear - and think/link this back to Brontë's life and her motherly influences.

Hope this gives you an extra point to look at and write on! x

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10 out of 11 people found this helpful

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