Search Menu

Contents

“Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen

page 3 of 3

“Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen

“Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen

“Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen

“Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen

“Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen

While Hugo’s sympathies lie with the revolutionaries, he is too disgusted with bloodshed to portray the insurrection as a glorious moment in French history. He shows us small acts of heroism, such as Mabeuf’s attempt to rescue the flag, but he primarily portrays the barricade as a place of unnecessary brutality and pointless violence. Enjolras’s execution of one of his own men for killing a civilian is justifiable, but it makes us wonder whether even the most principled violence might inevitably lead to murder and mayhem of the worst kind. In contrast to the example Enjolras and his men set, Valjean avoids killing anyone, even his most bitter enemy. Hugo suggests that revolution does not have to involve violence and that the only truly revolutionary weapons are forgiveness and kindness.

Test Your Understanding with the “Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen Quiz

Take a quiz on this section
Test Your Understanding with the “Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen Quiz

TAKE THE QUIZ
+
#

“SAINT-DENIS,” BOOKS EIGHT–FIFTEEN QUIZ

Where does Valjean plan to move with Cosette?
America
England
Test Your Understanding with the “Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen Quiz
TAKE THE QUIZ

“Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen QUIZ

+
Test Your Understanding with the “Saint-Denis,” Books Eight–Fifteen Quiz
TAKE THE QUIZ

More Help

Previous Next
Les Miserables Analysis

by Adi31415, March 28, 2013

Les Miserables is based around the turning point in French history, and it explores the nature of this change in terms of society, and uses this as a basis for explaining the revolution. It explains how the ‘miserables’, or ‘victims’, damned into a life of thievery and being the scum of the Earth aren’t inherently bad. The society which has not given them a chance forces them to be bad, or do bad things. Instead of understanding their inner goodness and their plight to change their ways, or giving them some kindness or hope, they a... Read more

3 Comments

360 out of 380 people found this helpful

Correction to Note 1 in Study Section

by IleneRM, October 24, 2013

It says: "Fantine falls in love with Tholomyès, a debonair upper-class student who obeys upper-class social customs and leaves Fantine even though she is pregnant with his child." This is wrong. Fantine was not pregnant. Ten months after the affair ended, Cosette was almost 3 years old; therefore she was already born when he left Fantine.

4 Comments

12 out of 20 people found this helpful

Study Questions - error in #1

by IleneRM, October 24, 2013

It says: "Fantine falls in love with Tholomyès, a debonair upper-class student who obeys upper-class social customs and leaves Fantine even though she is pregnant with his child." This is wrong. Fantine was not pregnant. Ten months after the affair ended, Cosette was almost 3 years old; therefore she was already born when he left Fantine.

See all 7 readers' notes   →