Night

by: Elie Wiesel

Section One

1

Moishe was not the same. The joy in his eyes was gone. He no longer sang. He no longer mentioned either God or Kabbalah. He spoke only of what he had seen. But people not only refused to believe his tales, they refused to listen. Some even insinuated that he only wanted their pity, that he was imagining things. Others flatly said that he had gone mad.

2

Most people thought that we would remain in the ghetto until the end of the war, until the arrival of the Red Army. Afterward everything would be as before. The ghetto was ruled by neither German nor Jew; it was ruled by delusion.

3

They passed by me, one after the other, my teachers, my friends, the others, some of whom I had once feared, some of whom I had found ridiculous, all those whose lives I had shared for years. There they went, defeated, their bundles, their lives in tow, having left behind their homes, their childhood.

4

The night before, we had sat down to the traditional Friday night meal. We had said the customary blessings over the bread and wine and swallowed the food in silence. We sensed that we were gathered around the familial table for the last time. I spent that night going over memories and ideas and unable to fall asleep.

5

Two Gestapo officers strolled down the length of the platform. They were all smiles; all things considered, it had gone very smoothly. A prolonged whistle pierced the air. The wheels began to grind. We were on our way.