Murder on the Orient Express

by: Agatha Christie

Part three, Chapters 1–3

The comedy and satisfaction the reader receives from M. Bouc and Dr. Constantine is very important. Without the presence of M. Bouc and Dr. Constantine, readers might find it difficult to related to Poirot. M. Bouc and Dr. Constantine elevate the reader's own perception of herself, saying "I'm smarter than them!" This ego-boost keeps the reader in the game, it motivates the reader to keep reading and playing. It is harder to be frustrated with the whodunnit because there exists two characters who are perpetually more frustrated than herself. This self-satisfaction may be a complete delusion for the reader, they may know less than M. Bouc or Dr. Constantine, but the "Watson" character is always the comic scapegoat-the person who will always seem the least intelligent.