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Okonkwo

Okonkwo

Okonkwo, the son of the effeminate and lazy Unoka, strives to make his way in a world that seems to value manliness. In so doing, he rejects everything for which he believes his father stood. Unoka was idle, poor, profligate, cowardly, gentle, and interested in music and conversation. Okonkwo consciously adopts opposite ideals and becomes productive, wealthy, thrifty, brave, violent, and adamantly opposed to music and anything else that he perceives to be “soft,” such as conversation and emotion. He is stoic to a fault.

Okonkwo achieves great social and financial success by embracing these ideals. He marries three women and fathers several children. Nevertheless, just as his father was at odds with the values of the community around him, so too does Okonkwo find himself unable to adapt to changing times as the white man comes to live among the Umuofians. As it becomes evident that compliance rather than violence constitutes the wisest principle for survival, Okonkwo realizes that he has become a relic, no longer able to function within his changing society.

Okonkwo is a tragic hero in the classical sense: although he is a superior character, his tragic flaw—the equation of manliness with rashness, anger, and violence—brings about his own destruction. Okonkwo is gruff, at times, and usually unable to express his feelings (the narrator frequently uses the word “inwardly” in reference to Okonkwo’s emotions). But his emotions are indeed quite complex, as his “manly” values conflict with his “unmanly” ones, such as fondness for Ikemefuna and Ezinma. The narrator privileges us with information that Okonkwo’s fellow clan members do not have—that Okonkwo surreptitiously follows Ekwefi into the forest in pursuit of Ezinma, for example—and thus allows us to see the tender, worried father beneath the seemingly indifferent exterior.

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OKONKWO QUIZ

Why does Okonkwo disown Nwoye?
Because Okonkwo can’t handle the male competition
Because Nwoye fails at farming
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Okonkwo QUIZ

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Culture of the Igbo society in the light of the novel Things Fall Apart.

by touhidsm, May 06, 2014

Read Full Answer at

http://josbd.com/Things_Fall_Apart.html


Answer: Things Fall Apart is a novel written in English by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. The novel depicts the life of Okonkwo, a leader and local wrestling champion in Umuofia - one of a fictional group of nine villages in Nigeria inhabited by the Igbo people. It focuses on his family and personal history, the customs and society of the Igbo and the influence of British colonialism and Christian m... Read more

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174 out of 197 people found this helpful

Help

by audicolen, May 19, 2015

Question 1.1.
In Things Fall Apart, Part Three, how is Reverend Smith different from Mr. Brown?

(Points : 2)

Mr. Brown believed in compromise and accommodation while Reverend Smith believes he must wipe out what he views as the ignorance.

Mr. Brown made many enemies while in Umuofia while Reverend Smith tries to make friends.

Mr. Brown’s primary goal was to build the church while Reverend Smith’s goal is to build schools.

Mr. Brown encouraged fighting while Reverend Smith encourages prayer.

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4 out of 9 people found this helpful

class names for the people

by whyineeddothis, May 28, 2015

The Osu are the title-less, worthless people, not the efulefu, I am fairly sure the efulefu are the Christians

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8 out of 31 people found this helpful

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Things Fall Apart

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