Search Menu

Contents

Symbols

Symbols

Symbols are objects, characters, figures, and colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts.

Moors

The constant emphasis on landscape within the text of Wuthering Heights endows the setting with symbolic importance. This landscape is comprised primarily of moors: wide, wild expanses, high but somewhat soggy, and thus infertile. Moorland cannot be cultivated, and its uniformity makes navigation difficult. It features particularly waterlogged patches in which people could potentially drown. (This possibility is mentioned several times in Wuthering Heights.) Thus, the moors serve very well as symbols of the wild threat posed by nature. As the setting for the beginnings of Catherine and Heathcliff’s bond (the two play on the moors during childhood), the moorland transfers its symbolic associations onto the love affair.

Ghosts

Ghosts appear throughout Wuthering Heights, as they do in most other works of Gothic fiction, yet Brontë always presents them in such a way that whether they really exist remains ambiguous. Thus the world of the novel can always be interpreted as a realistic one. Certain ghosts—such as Catherine’s spirit when it appears to Lockwood in Chapter III—may be explained as nightmares. The villagers’ alleged sightings of Heathcliff’s ghost in Chapter XXXIV could be dismissed as unverified superstition. Whether or not the ghosts are “real,” they symbolize the manifestation of the past within the present, and the way memory stays with people, permeating their day-to-day lives.

More main ideas from Wuthering Heights

Take the Themes, Motifs & Symbols Quick Quiz

TAKE THE QUIZ
+
#

THEMES, MOTIFS & SYMBOLS QUICK QUIZ

What does Nelly think of Heathcliff and Catherine’s love?
That it is heavenly
That it is doomed
Take the Themes, Motifs & Symbols Quick Quiz
TAKE THE QUIZ

Themes, Motifs & Symbols Quick QUIZ

+
Take the Themes, Motifs & Symbols Quick Quiz
TAKE THE QUIZ

More Help

Previous Next