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Top 5 Geekiest Movie Musicals

Top 5 Geekiest Movie Musicals

By Swapna Krishna

There are a lot of great movies out right now, but one that everyone is talking about is Les Miserables, the Victor Hugo-penned novel that was adapted into one of the most famous musicals of all time. We thought it was fine (well, some of us didn't) but there was ZERO geek factor to it! So, in honor of all the musical theatre geeks out there, we give you our top 5 geekiest movie musicals OF ALL TIME.

5) Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

Little Shop of Horrors started out as a stage musical... but the stage musical that the movie version was based on was based on a movie. Confused yet? Little Shop of Horrors was originally a movie by campy horror director Roger Corman (who also made such gems as A Bucket of Blood) in the 1960s. Composer Alan Menken (who would later go on to write the music for Disney's Beauty and the Beast) and writer Howard Ashman adapted the script for the stage, creating an off-Broadway musical. They then decided to bring it back as a movie, but this time, they included the music they'd written. Little Shop of Horrors is the definition of a cult film, about a flower shop owner whose plant has a taste for blood. It's a wacky and crazy, but all the geeks seem to adore it (including those from Glee, which did a tribute episode featuring the movie/play's music). If you live in a town with an independent movie theater, chances are you can find a screening of Little Shop of Horrors complete with an audience sing-along.

4) Labyrinth (1986)

Yes, we realize including a movie with puppets in a movie musicals countdown is kind of cheating—after all, we're not including any animated movies. But because the main characters of Labyrinth are human, it qualifies. A very young Jennifer Connelly stars in this movie about an evil king named Jareth (hello, crazy looking David Bowie), king of the goblins, who kidaps Connelly's baby brother. In order to get him back, Connelly must solve the puzzle of the labyrinth. Sounds awesome, right? Well, this movie didn't do so well when it was first released. It was considered big-budget, with a whopping $25 million budget, but it made less than $13 million. Since then, though, it has become—you guessed it!—a cult film.

3) Earth Girls are Easy (1988)

It's called Earth Girls are Easy and it stars Jeff Goldblum. Do we really need to explain why this movie is on our list?

2) Dick Tracy (1990)

Not only is it a campy, cheesy movie, but Dick Tracy is also based on a comic strip. How much geekier can you get? Stephen Sondheim, one of the most prolific Broadway composers of all time, wrote the one of the movie's original songs, sung by Madonna, which won an Academy Award. A geek bonus? Mandy Patinkin, currently on Homeland, but cherished in our hearts for his role as Inigo "You killed my father. Prepare to die." Montoya from The Princess Bride, also sings on the cast recording.

1) Newsies (1992)

On the surface, Newsies actually isn't that geeky. It's about newsboys, or newspaper sellers, who go on strike in the late 1800s in New York and how this ragtag bunch of often-homeless teens took on the big newspapers of the city—and won. Sounds inspirational, right? Well, the movie FLOPPED upon its opening. Believe it or not, Christian Bale, The Dark Knight himself, not only plays the main character, but he SINGS. A LOT. And it is AWESOME. Newsies has been in the news recently because it's been adapted as a Broadway play due to its cult status and it's actually doing incredibly well. If you weren't forced to sit through this movie in high school, pop in the DVD and see why so many people hold this musical so close to their hearts.

What's your favorite movie musical?

Tags: movies, singing, musicals, theatre, les miserables, newsies, little shop of horrors

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About the Author
Swapna Krishna

Swapna is a Washington, DC-based freelance editor who loves all things space and sci fi. You can find her book reviews at S. Krishna’s Books (http://www.skrishnasbooks.com) and on Twitter at @skrishna.

Wanna contact a writer or editor? Email contribute@sparknotes.com.