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Mindhut

10 More Terrifying Real Life Monsters

By Vadim Newquist May 30, 2013

2 of 11

Burmese Python

If you're planning on taking a trip to Burma anytime soon, do sample the local cuisine, but stay the freaking heck away from their snakes! The Burmese Python is one of worlds largest, capable of reaching lengths of up to twenty-three feet, a width of one foot and can weigh up to a whopping two hundred pounds. Although not poisonous, they are formidable attackers, crushing their prey's vertebrae through constriction, so if you thought your old Aunt Nerma's hugs were unpleasant, just be thankful she doesn't swallow you whole afterwards.

Unfortunately, steering clear of Burma may not guarantee you won't encounter them, as they are currently running rampant in the Florida Everglades and are responsible for a steep decline in the populations of everything from rabbits and raccoons to bobcats and deer! To tell you the truth, these pythons are USUALLY docile around humans and have long been the pet of choice amongst snake lovers; however, when they are released into the wild they can nearly triple in length, so if you're happen to be vacationing in the Everglades, be sure to pack your snake repellent!

Tags: animals, sci fi, monsters, slideshows, nature, life

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About the Author
Vadim Newquist

Vadim Newquist is a writer, director, actor, animator, fire fighter, stunt driver, martial arts instructor, snake wrangler and time traveling bounty hunter who scales tall buildings with his bare hands and wrestles sharks in his spare time. He can do ten consecutive backflips in one jump, make cars explode with his mind, and can give fifty people a high-five at once without even lifting his hands. He holds multiple PhDs in nuclear physics, osteopathic medicine, behavioral psychology, breakdancing, and chilling out. He currently resides in Gotham City inside his stately mansion with his butler Alfred and his two cats.

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