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10 Non-Robo Cops From Sci Fi

10 Non-Robo Cops From Sci Fi

By Ryan Britt

Even if you’ve never seen the original RoboCop, you’re probably not fooled at all by the tagline on all of RoboCop’s promotional posters: “Crime has a new enemy.” New? Crime has an OLD enemy and his name is Alex Murphy! Though originally a 1987 film directed by Paul Verhoeven, RoboCop also saw life as a TV show, a comic book series, a cartoon and more. But what about other sci-fi cops? Here’s ten robo-cops who’ve also been crimes’ new/old enemy.

 

Rick Deckard (Do Android Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick,  Blade Runner, et al.)

Deckard might be the classic robo-cop because of the simple fact that we don’t know if he’s a robot or not. (Spoiler alert?) Trained to hunt down and “retire” replicants, Deckard is a plainclothes cop living in a future in which Atari is still around. Cool.

 

Elijah “Lije” Bailey (The Caves of Steel, et al by Isaac Asimov)

Even though he’s the first law of robotics beings by stating “A robot may not injure a human being…” Isaac Asimov nonetheless delved into the question or robot murders. Spanning several novels, Bailey is cop/robot expert sent to track down the possibly positronic bad guys.

 

Odo (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

Called “Constable” by everyone on the Deep Space Nine, Odo is maybe the sneakiest cop of all time. Think you sell those illegal space drugs in your room? Are you sure that lampshade was there before? Could it be the shape-shifting cop running the security of the station? Yep. Busted.

 

George Francisco (Alien Nation)

The best thing about George Francisco, other than he’s an alien, is that he also has the ability to get pregnant. Pregnant dude cop. Other questions?

 

Nick Knight (Forever Knight)

He’s a vampire who has been around like...forever, which probably has something to do with how they came up with the title. Nick Knight is a great vampire but sometimes it’s hard to remember he’s a cop, too. It always seemed like something the producers hoisted on the writers: we love the vampire, but, please, for the sake of suburban viewership, can he be a cop?

 

Jake Cardigan (Tek War novels, et al.by William Shatner)

In a future where downloading certain computer programs is illegal, Jake Cardigan can bust you for too much fun-time in virtual reality. But who is going to rescue Jake when he’s framed for possession Tek? (Um...William Shatner. Duh.)

Commander Chennault (Space Rangers)

She runs a group of outer space cops and she’s played by Linda Hunt. A kind of combination of Yoda and tough-as-nails sergeant, Commander Chennault maybe have been stuck in terrible 90’s show with low production value, but she’s still the best leader of cops on this list.

Super Force/Zachary Stone (Super Force)

In the year 2020, times are tough, and supposedly, this man is tougher! A former astronaut, turned vigilante, Super Force is like RoboCop only he can take off the “robo” part. Super Force also has a fairly sweet motorcycle.

Darien Lambert (Time Trax)

Certainly not the most awesome cop on this list, but Darien Lambert was a time cop before there was a “real” time cop. He’s also the only cop on this list who carries a key chain/garage door opener instead of a gun.

Jim Shannon (Terra Nova)

When the Shannons emigrate to the Cretaceous period, dinosaurs aren’t the only problem facing the colonists of Terra Nova. There’s crime too! Though it was canceled after only one season, dinosaur cop Jim Shannon, by virtue of living in the Mesozoic era, might technically be the first sci-fi cop in the history of the world!

There are tons of other sci-fi and fantasy cops; which favorite of yours was left off our list?

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Tags: movies, robocop, reboots, remakes, scifi

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About the Author
Ryan Britt

Ryan Britt is the author of Luke Skywalker Can't Read and Other Geeky Truths , forthcoming from Plume Books in Fall of 2015. His writing has appeared with The New York Times, The Awl, VICE, The MindHut, Electric Literature, Tor.com, and elsewhere. He's taught for The Gotham Writers' Workshop and the Sackett Street Writers' Workshop and lives in New York City.

Wanna contact a writer or editor? Email contribute@sparknotes.com.