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A Tale of Two Cities

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“Truly, madame, I think so. For the moment.” “Honestly, madame, I think so. At least for the moment.”
“If you were shown a great heap of dolls, and were set upon them to pluck them to pieces and despoil them for your own advantage, you would pick out the richest and gayest. Say! Would you not?” “If you were shown a big pile of dolls and were told to pull them apart and steal parts of them to take for yourself, you would pick out the richest and most colorful. Wouldn’t you?”
“Truly yes, madame.” “Honestly, madame, yes.”
“Yes. And if you were shown a flock of birds, unable to fly, and were set upon them to strip them of their feathers for your own advantage, you would set upon the birds of the finest feathers; would you not?” “Yes. And if you were shown a flock of birds that couldn’t fly and were told to pluck off their feathers and take for them yourself, you would go after the birds with the prettiest feathers, wouldn’t you?”
“It is true, madame.” “It’s true, madame.”
“You have seen both dolls and birds to-day,” said Madame Defarge, with a wave of her hand towards the place where they had last been apparent; “now, go home!” “You’ve seen both dolls and birds today,” said Madame Defarge with a wave of her hand toward where the king and queen and their attendants had been seen. “Now go home!”

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