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A Tale of Two Cities

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“Indeed, my own? Why so?” “Really, my love? Why do you say so?”
“That is what you are not to ask me. But I think—I know—he does.” “That is the question you shouldn’t ask me. But I think—I know—that he does.”
“If you know it, it is enough. What would you have me do, my Life?” “If you know it, it’s good enough for me. What do you want me to do, my darling?”
“I would ask you, dearest, to be very generous with him always, and very lenient on his faults when he is not by. I would ask you to believe that he has a heart he very, very seldom reveals, and that there are deep wounds in it. My dear, I have seen it bleeding.” “I want you to always be very kind to him and to forgive his faults when he is not near. I want you to believe that he is a kind, loving man even though he rarely lets anyone see that side of him. He has been hurt very badly. I have seen it.”
“It is a painful reflection to me,” said Charles Darnay, quite astounded, “that I should have done him any wrong. I never thought this of him.” “It hurts me to know that I treated him poorly,” said Charles Darnay, surprised. “I never knew this about him.”
“My husband, it is so. I fear he is not to be reclaimed; there is scarcely a hope that anything in his character or fortunes is reparable now. But, I am sure that he is capable of good things, gentle things, even magnanimous things.” “It’s true. I’m afraid he is a lost cause. There is hardly any hope that he can fix anything about his character or luck, but I’m sure that he is capable of doing good, kind, even generous things.”
She looked so beautiful in the purity of her faith in this lost man, that her husband could have looked at her as she was for hours. Miss Manette’s faith in Mr. Carton made her look so beautiful that her husband could have looked at her for hours.
“And, O my dearest Love!” she urged, clinging nearer to him, laying her head upon his breast, and raising her eyes to his, “remember how strong we are in our happiness, and how weak he is in his misery!” “Oh, my dearest love!” she said, pulling close to him and putting her head on his chest. Looking up at him, she said, “Remember how happy we are, and how miserable he is!”
The supplication touched him home. “I will always remember it, dear Heart! I will remember it as long as I live.” Darnay was moved by her request. “I will always remember it, dear heart. I will remember it as long as I live.”
He bent over the golden head, and put the rosy lips to his, and folded her in his arms. If one forlorn wanderer then pacing the dark streets, could have heard her innocent disclosure, and could have seen the drops of pity kissed away by her husband from the soft blue eyes so loving of that husband, he might have cried to the night—and the words would not have parted from his lips for the first time—“God bless her for her sweet compassion!” He leaned over her golden hair, kissed her, and took her in his arms. If Mr. Carton, who was wandering the streets in the dark, could have heard her innocent confession and could have seen her husband kiss the tears away from her soft, blue eyes, he might have cried out, “God bless her for her sweet compassion!” It wouldn’t have been the first time he had said this about Miss Manette.

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