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A Tale of Two Cities

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It was the rush and roar of rain that he typified, and it stopped him, for no voice could be heard in it. A memorable storm of thunder and lightning broke with that sweep of water, and there was not a moment’s interval in crash, and fire, and rain, until after the moon rose at midnight. He was talking about the rush and roar of rain, and he stopped talking because he couldn’t be heard over the rain. A terrific storm of thunder and lightning broke, and the thunder, lightning, and rain did not stop even for an instant until after the moon rose at midnight.
The great bell of Saint Paul’s was striking one in the cleared air, when Mr. Lorry, escorted by Jerry, high-booted and bearing a lantern, set forth on his return-passage to Clerkenwell. There were solitary patches of road on the way between Soho and Clerkenwell, and Mr. Lorry, mindful of foot-pads, always retained Jerry for this service: though it was usually performed a good two hours earlier. The bell at Saint Paul’s Cathedral struck one o’clock in the now clear air. Mr. Lorry headed home to Clerkenwell, escorted by Jerry, who wore high boots and carried a lantern. There were lonely parts of the road on the way between Soho and Clerkenwell, and Mr. Lorry worried about thieves and always used Jerry for a ride home, though he usually headed home two hours earlier.
“What a night it has been! Almost a night, Jerry,” said Mr. Lorry, “to bring the dead out of their graves.” “What a night it has been!” said Mr. Lorry. “Almost a night that would bring the dead out of their graves, Jerry.”
“I never see the night myself, master—nor yet I don’t expect to—what would do that,” answered Jerry. “I’ve never seen a night that would do that. And I don’t expect to,” answered Jerry.
“Good night, Mr. Carton,” said the man of business. “Good night, Mr. Darnay. Shall we ever see such a night again, together!” “Good night, Mr. Carton,” said Mr. Lorry. “Good night, Mr. Darnay. Do you think we’ll ever see such a night together again?”
Perhaps. Perhaps, see the great crowd of people with its rush and roar, bearing down upon them, too. They might. They might also see a great roaring crowd of people come rushing at them, too.

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