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A Tale of Two Cities

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The valet had put her away from the door, the carriage had broken into a brisk trot, the postilions had quickened the pace, she was left far behind, and Monseigneur, again escorted by the Furies, was rapidly diminishing the league or two of distance that remained between him and his chateau. The valet moved her away from the door, and the carriage drove away quickly. The horsemen sped up, and she was left far behind. The monseigneur, accompanied by his entourage, was quickly covering the league or two of distance between him and his country house.
The sweet scents of the summer night rose all around him, and rose, as the rain falls, impartially, on the dusty, ragged, and toil-worn group at the fountain not far away; to whom the mender of roads, with the aid of the blue cap without which he was nothing, still enlarged upon his man like a spectre, as long as they could bear it. By degrees, as they could bear no more, they dropped off one by one, and lights twinkled in little casements; which lights, as the casements darkened, and more stars came out, seemed to have shot up into the sky instead of having been extinguished. The summer air was sweet all around him, and the same air surrounded the dusty, ragged, worn-out group of peasants at the fountain close by. The repairer of roads with the blue cap was still telling the story of the man under the carriage. As the crowd grew tired of the story, they walked away one by one. Lights started to shine in the little windows of the village, and the lights in the windows went out and more stars appeared. It looked as if the lights in the windows hadn’t been put out but had shot up into the sky.
The shadow of a large high-roofed house, and of many over-hanging trees, was upon Monsieur the Marquis by that time; and the shadow was exchanged for the light of a flambeau, as his carriage stopped, and the great door of his chateau was opened to him. By then the marquis was at his large, high-roofed house, which was surrounded by trees. A torch was lit, and his carriage stopped and a large door of his chateau was opened for him.
“Monsieur Charles, whom I expect; is he arrived from England?” “I am expecting Monsieur Charles. Has he arrived from England yet?” the marquis asked one of his servants.
“Monseigneur, not yet.” “Not yet, Monseigneur,” the servant replied.

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