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A Tale of Two Cities

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As he was drawn away, his wife released him, and stood looking after him with her hands touching one another in the attitude of prayer, and with a radiant look upon her face, in which there was even a comforting smile. As he went out at the prisoners’ door, she turned, laid her head lovingly on her father’s breast, tried to speak to him, and fell at his feet. Lucie let go of him as the guards pulled him away. She stood watching him, her hands clasped together in a position of prayer. She had a radiant look on her face and was even smiling comfortingly. As he went out through the prisoners’ door, she turned and put her head lovingly on her father’s breast, tried to speak to him, and fell at his feet.
Then, issuing from the obscure corner from which he had never moved, Sydney Carton came and took her up. Only her father and Mr. Lorry were with her. His arm trembled as it raised her, and supported her head. Yet, there was an air about him that was not all of pity—that had a flush of pride in it. Then, Sydney Carton came out of the hidden corner from which he had never moved and picked her up. Only her father and Mr. Lorry were with her. His arm trembled as he raised her and supported her head, yet there was a manner about him that wasn’t all pity. There was something proud in him.
“Shall I take her to a coach? I shall never feel her weight.” “Shall I take her to a coach? She’s so light, I won't even feel her weight.”
He carried her lightly to the door, and laid her tenderly down in a coach. Her father and their old friend got into it, and he took his seat beside the driver. He carried her easily to the door and laid her tenderly down in a coach. Her father and Mr. Lorry got into it, and Carton took his seat beside the driver.
When they arrived at the gateway where he had paused in the dark not many hours before, to picture to himself on which of the rough stones of the street her feet had trodden, he lifted her again, and carried her up the staircase to their rooms. There, he laid her down on a couch, where her child and Miss Pross wept over her. They arrived at the gate where he had stopped in the dark just a few hours before to wonder which cobblestones Lucie had walked on. He lifted her again and carried her up the staircase to their apartment. There, he laid her down on a couch, and her daughter and Miss Pross wept over her.
“Don’t recall her to herself,” he said, softly, to the latter, “she is better so. Don’t revive her to consciousness, while she only faints.” “Don’t revive her,” he said softly to Miss Pross. “She is better off unconscious. She has only fainted.”
“Oh, Carton, Carton, dear Carton!” cried little Lucie, springing up and throwing her arms passionately round him, in a burst of grief. “Now that you have come, I think you will do something to help mamma, something to save papa! O, look at her, dear Carton! Can you, of all the people who love her, bear to see her so?” “Oh, Carton, Carton, dear Carton!” cried little Lucie. She jumped up and threw her arms around him passionately, in a burst of grief. “Now that you have come, I think you’ll do something to help Mamma and save Papa! Oh, look at her, dear Carton! Can you, of all the people who love her, stand to see her like this?”
He bent over the child, and laid her blooming cheek against his face. He put her gently from him, and looked at her unconscious mother. He leaned over the child and laid her cheek against his face. He pulled her off of him gently and looked at her unconscious mother.
“Before I go,” he said, and paused—”I may kiss her?” “Before I go,” he said, pausing, “may I kiss her?”
It was remembered afterwards that when he bent down and touched her face with his lips, he murmured some words. The child, who was nearest to him, told them afterwards, and told her grandchildren when she was a handsome old lady, that she heard him say, “A life you love.” They remembered afterward that when he bent down and kissed her face, he murmured some words. Little Lucie, who was closest to him, told them afterward, and told her grandchildren when she was an old woman, that she heard him say, “A life you love.”
When he had gone out into the next room, he turned suddenly on Mr. Lorry and her father, who were following, and said to the latter: When he had gone into the next room, he turned suddenly toward Mr. Lorry and her father, who were following him. He said to the doctor:
“You had great influence but yesterday, Doctor Manette; let it at least be tried. These judges, and all the men in power, are very friendly to you, and very recognisant of your services; are they not?” “You had great influence as recently as yesterday, Dr. Manette. At least try to use it again. These judges and all of these men in power are very friendly to you. They know very well what you have done, don’t they?”
“Nothing connected with Charles was concealed from me. I had the strongest assurances that I should save him; and I did.” He returned the answer in great trouble, and very slowly. “Nothing about Charles was hidden from me when he was in prison. I was assured that I would definitely save him, and I did.” He answered with great difficulty and very slowly.

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