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A Tale of Two Cities

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“I do not doubt it,” answered Mr. Lorry. “Say on.” “I’m sure that you do,” answered Mr. Lorry. “Go on.”
The figure in the chair between them, was all the time monotonously rocking itself to and fro, and moaning. They spoke in such a tone as they would have used if they had been watching by a sick-bed in the night. Dr. Manette was rocking back and forth and moaning the whole time as he sat in a chair between them. They spoke quietly, as if they were sitting by a patient’s sickbed at night.
Carton stooped to pick up the coat, which lay almost entangling his feet. As he did so, a small case in which the Doctor was accustomed to carry the lists of his day’s duties, fell lightly on the floor. Carton took it up, and there was a folded paper in it. “We should look at this!” he said. Mr. Lorry nodded his consent. He opened it, and exclaimed, “Thank GOD!” Carton bent over to pick up the coat. It lay on the floor and was almost wrapped around his feet. As he did so, a small case in which the doctor carried his list of the day’s duties fell on the floor. Carton picked it up, and there was a folded paper in it. “We should look at this!” he said. Mr. Lorry nodded in agreement. He opened it and exclaimed, “Thank God!”
“What is it?” asked Mr. Lorry, eagerly. “What is it? “ Mr. Lorry asked anxiously.
“A moment! Let me speak of it in its place. First,” he put his hand in his coat, and took another paper from it, “that is the certificate which enables me to pass out of this city. Look at it. You see—Sydney Carton, an Englishman?” “Give me a moment. Let me talk about it in context.” He put his hand in his coat pocket and took out another piece of paper. “This is a certificate that allows me to leave Paris. Look at it. You see? It says, ‘Sydney Carton, an Englishman.’”
Mr. Lorry held it open in his hand, gazing in his earnest face. Mr. Lorry held it open in his hand and looked at Carton’s face.
“Keep it for me until to-morrow. I shall see him to-morrow, you remember, and I had better not take it into the prison.” “Hold onto it for me until tomorrow. You remember that I am going to go see Darnay tomorrow. I'd better not bring it with me into the prison.”
“Why not? “Why not?”
“I don’t know; I prefer not to do so. Now, take this paper that Doctor Manette has carried about him. It is a similar certificate, enabling him and his daughter and her child, at any time, to pass the barrier and the frontier! You see?” “I don’t know. I’d prefer not to. Now, take this paper that Dr. Manette has been carrying with him. It is a similar certificate, which allows Lucie and her daughter to cross the barrier out of Paris at any time. You see?”
“Yes!” “Yes!”
“Perhaps he obtained it as his last and utmost precaution against evil, yesterday. When is it dated? But no matter; don’t stay to look; put it up carefully with mine and your own. Now, observe! I never doubted until within this hour or two, that he had, or could have such a paper. It is good, until recalled. But it may be soon recalled, and, I have reason to think, will be.” “Perhaps he got it as his last safety measure yesterday. When is it dated? It doesn’t matter. Don’t stay to look. Tuck it away carefully with my certificate and your own. Now, look! I never doubted until the past hour or two that he had, or could get, a paper like this. It is valid until it is revoked, but it may be revoked soon, and I have reason to think that it will be.”
“They are not in danger?” “They are not in danger?”
“They are in great danger. They are in danger of denunciation by Madame Defarge. I know it from her own lips. I have overheard words of that woman’s, to-night, which have presented their danger to me in strong colours. I have lost no time, and since then, I have seen the spy. He confirms me. He knows that a wood-sawyer, living by the prison wall, is under the control of the Defarges, and has been rehearsed by Madame Defarge as to his having seen Her”—he never mentioned Lucie’s name—”making signs and signals to prisoners. It is easy to foresee that the pretence will be the common one, a prison plot, and that it will involve her life—and perhaps her child’s—and perhaps her father’s—for both have been seen with her at that place. Don’t look so horrified. You will save them all.” “They are in great danger. They are in danger of being accused by Madame Defarge. I heard it from her own lips. I have overheard things she said tonight that make it clear they are in great danger. I didn’t waste time. I went to see Barsad right away, and he confirmed it for me. He knows that a wood sawyer who lives by the prison wall is under the influence of Monsieur and Madame Defarge. They have told him to say that he has seen 'her'—he never mentioned Lucie’s name—making signs and signals to the prisoners. It’s easy to see that they will make the usual claim—that she is involved in a prison plot. They will accuse Lucie, and possibly her daughter and her father, since they have all been seen there. Don’t look so horrified. You will save all of them.”
“Heaven grant I may, Carton! But how?” “I hope to Heaven that I will, Carton. But how?”

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