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A Tale of Two Cities

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“I am going to tell you how. It will depend on you, and it could depend on no better man. This new denunciation will certainly not take place until after to-morrow; probably not until two or three days afterwards; more probably a week afterwards. You know it is a capital crime, to mourn for, or sympathise with, a victim of the Guillotine. She and her father would unquestionably be guilty of this crime, and this woman (the inveteracy of whose pursuit cannot be described) would wait to add that strength to her case, and make herself doubly sure. You follow me?” “I will tell you how. It will depend on you, and there is no better man than you to depend on. This new accusation will certainly not take place until after tomorrow, probably not until two or three days afterward. It’s more likely that it will be a week afterward. You know it is a capital crime to mourn for or sympathize with someone who is executed at the guillotine, so she and her father will without a doubt be guilty of this crime. Madame Defarge, who will stop at nothing, will add that accusation to her case and make sure that they are convicted. You follow me?”
“So attentively, and with so much confidence in what you say, that for the moment I lose sight,” touching the back of the Doctor’s chair, “even of this distress.” “I’m listening so closely, and with so much confidence that what you say is true, that for the moment I have even forgotten about this problem,” Mr. Lorry said, touching the back of the doctor’s chair.
“You have money, and can buy the means of travelling to the seacoast as quickly as the journey can be made. Your preparations have been completed for some days, to return to England. Early to-morrow have your horses ready, so that they may be in starting trim at two o’clock in the afternoon.” “You have money. You can pay for the quickest possible means of travel to the seacoast. You made plans to return to England some days ago. Have your horses made ready early tomorrow so that they can leave at two o’clock in the afternoon.”
“It shall be done!” “I will do it!”
His manner was so fervent and inspiring, that Mr. Lorry caught the flame, and was as quick as youth. Carton was so passionate and inspiring that it made Mr. Lorry as eager as a young man.
“You are a noble heart. Did I say we could depend upon no better man? Tell her, to-night, what you know of her danger as involving her child and her father. Dwell upon that, for she would lay her own fair head beside her husband’s cheerfully.” He faltered for an instant; then went on as before. “For the sake of her child and her father, press upon her the necessity of leaving Paris, with them and you, at that hour. Tell her that it was her husband’s last arrangement. Tell her that more depends upon it than she dare believe, or hope. You think that her father, even in this sad state, will submit himself to her; do you not?” “You are a good man. Did I say that there is no better man we could depend on? Tell Lucie tonight about the danger you know regarding her child and father. Focus on that, because she would happily die along with her husband.” He hesitated for a moment and then continued on as before. “Tell her that, for the sake of her child and father, she needs to leave Paris with her daughter, her father, and you at that time. Tell her it was the last arrangement her husband made. Tell her that more depends on it than she would dare believe or hope. You think that her father, even as disturbed as he is, will go with her, don’t you?”
“I am sure of it.” “I’m sure of it.”
“I thought so. Quietly and steadily have all these arrangements made in the courtyard here, even to the taking of your own seat in the carriage. The moment I come to you, take me in, and drive away.” “I thought so. Make these arrangements quietly and quickly in the courtyard outside. You should even go so far as to already be sitting in the carriage. The moment I come to you, take me into the carriage and drive away.”
“I understand that I wait for you under all circumstances?” “I should wait for you under any circumstances, yes?”
“You have my certificate in your hand with the rest, you know, and will reserve my place. Wait for nothing but to have my place occupied, and then for England!” “You have my travel certificate in your hand with the others, you know, and will save my place. Wait for nothing else except to have my place in the carriage filled, then leave for England!”
“Why, then,” said Mr. Lorry, grasping his eager but so firm and steady hand, “it does not all depend on one old man, but I shall have a young and ardent man at my side.” “Why, then,” said Mr. Lorry, grasping his eager, steady hand, “it doesn’t all depend on me, an old man. I will have a strong, young man by my side helping me.”
“By the help of Heaven you shall! Promise me solemnly that nothing will influence you to alter the course on which we now stand pledged to one another.” “With Heaven’s help you will! Promise me that nothing will make you change the plan that we have agreed on.”
“Nothing, Carton.” “Nothing, Carton.”
“Remember these words to-morrow: change the course, or delay in it—for any reason—and no life can possibly be saved, and many lives must inevitably be sacrificed.” “Remember this conversation tomorrow. If you change the plan, or delay for any reason, no one’s life can possibly be saved, and many lives will be sacrificed.”

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