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A Tale of Two Cities

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“I will remember them. I hope to do my part faithfully.” “I will remember it. I hope to do my part faithfully.”
“And I hope to do mine. Now, good bye!” “And I hope to do mine. Now, goodbye!”
Though he said it with a grave smile of earnestness, and though he even put the old man’s hand to his lips, he did not part from him then. He helped him so far to arouse the rocking figure before the dying embers, as to get a cloak and hat put upon it, and to tempt it forth to find where the bench and work were hidden that it still moaningly besought to have. He walked on the other side of it and protected it to the courtyard of the house where the afflicted heart—so happy in the memorable time when he had revealed his own desolate heart to it—outwatched the awful night. He entered the courtyard and remained there for a few moments alone, looking up at the light in the window of her room. Before he went away, he breathed a blessing towards it, and a Farewell. Though he said it with a sincere smile and even kissed Mr. Lorry’s hand, he didn’t leave him yet. He helped him get Dr. Manette, who was rocking back and forth in front of the dying embers in the fireplace, to his feet. They helped him put a cloak and a hat on, and they lured him outside by telling him that they were looking for the hidden bench and shoes that he was crying out for. Carton walked on the other side of the doctor and protected him as they walked through the courtyard of the Manette’s house. Lucie was there. She was so sad now, and she had been so happy back when Carton had told her of his feelings for her. Carton entered the courtyard and remained there for a few minutes alone, looking up at the light coming from her window. Before he went away, he said a blessing for her and said goodbye.

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