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A Tale of Two Cities

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“Those rooms are all in disorder, there has been hurried packing, there are odds and ends upon the ground. There is no one in that room behind you! Let me look.” “Those rooms are all a mess. Someone has been packing quickly, and there are odds and ends on the ground. There is no one in that room behind you, is there? Let me look.”
“Never!” said Miss Pross, who understood the request as perfectly as Madame Defarge understood the answer. “Never!” said Miss Pross, who understood the request as perfectly as Madame Defarge understood the answer.
“If they are not in that room, they are gone, and can be pursued and brought back,” said Madame Defarge to herself. “If they aren’t in that room, then they are gone. They can be chased and brought back,” Madame Defarge thought.
“As long as you don’t know whether they are in that room or not, you are uncertain what to do,” said Miss Pross to herself; “and you shall not know that, if I can prevent your knowing it; and know that, or not know that, you shall not leave here while I can hold you.” “As long as you don’t learn whether they are in that room or not, you won’t know what to do,” Miss Pross thought. “And you won’t learn that if I can help it. Whether you know that or not, you will stay here as long as I can keep you here.”
“I have been in the streets from the first, nothing has stopped me, I will tear you to pieces, but I will have you from that door,” said Madame Defarge. “I have been fighting in the streets since the beginning of the Revolution, and nothing has stopped me. I will tear you to pieces if I have to, but I will move you away from that door,” said Madame Defarge.
“We are alone at the top of a high house in a solitary courtyard, we are not likely to be heard, and I pray for bodily strength to keep you here, while every minute you are here is worth a hundred thousand guineas to my darling,” said Miss Pross. “We are alone at the top of a tall house in an empty courtyard. No one is likely to hear us. I pray for the physical strength to keep you here. Every minute you are here is worth a hundred thousand guineas to my darling Lucie,” said Miss Pross.
Madame Defarge made at the door. Miss Pross, on the instinct of the moment, seized her round the waist in both her arms, and held her tight. It was in vain for Madame Defarge to struggle and to strike; Miss Pross, with the vigorous tenacity of love, always so much stronger than hate, clasped her tight, and even lifted her from the floor in the struggle that they had. The two hands of Madame Defarge buffeted and tore her face; but, Miss Pross, with her head down, held her round the waist, and clung to her with more than the hold of a drowning woman. Madame Defarge moved toward the door. Miss Pross instinctively grabbed her around the waist with both arms and held onto her tightly. It was pointless for Madame Defarge to struggle and hit at her. Miss Pross held on to her tightly with the strength of love, which is always much stronger than hate. She even lifted her up off the floor while they struggled, and Madame Defarge beat and tore at Miss Pross’s face with her hands. Miss Pross kept her head down and held her around her waist, clinging to her with the force of a drowning woman.
Soon, Madame Defarge’s hands ceased to strike, and felt at her encircled waist. “It is under my arm,” said Miss Pross, in smothered tones, “you shall not draw it. I am stronger than you, I bless Heaven for it. I hold you till one or other of us faints or dies!” Soon, Madame Defarge stopped hitting Miss Pross and reached for the knife hidden at her waist. “Your knife is under my arm,” said Miss Pross. Her voice was stifled as they struggled. “You won’t draw it. I’m stronger than you, thank Heaven. I’ll hold you until one or the other of us faints or dies!”
Madame Defarge’s hands were at her bosom. Miss Pross looked up, saw what it was, struck at it, struck out a flash and a crash, and stood alone—blinded with smoke. Madame Defarge’s hands reached for her bosom. Miss Pross looked up and saw that she had grabbed her pistol. She struck at it, and there was a flash and a crash. Miss Pross stood there alone, blinded by smoke.
All this was in a second. As the smoke cleared, leaving an awful stillness, it passed out on the air, like the soul of the furious woman whose body lay lifeless on the ground. All of this happened in a second, and there was an awful stillness as the smoke cleared. The smoke moved through the air like the soul of Madame Defarge, whose body lied lifeless on the ground.
In the first fright and horror of her situation, Miss Pross passed the body as far from it as she could, and ran down the stairs to call for fruitless help. Happily, she bethought herself of the consequences of what she did, in time to check herself and go back. It was dreadful to go in at the door again; but, she did go in, and even went near it, to get the bonnet and other things that she must wear. These she put on, out on the staircase, first shutting and locking the door and taking away the key. She then sat down on the stairs a few moments to breathe and to cry, and then got up and hurried away. At first, Miss Pross was frightened and horrified, and she moved as far away from the body as she could. She ran downstairs to call for help, even though it was useless. Fortunately, she thought about the consequences of what she had done in time to stop herself and go back upstairs. It was awful for her to go in the room again, but she went back inside. She even went near the body to get the bonnet and other things that she needed to wear. She went out into the staircase and got dressed, but first she locked the door and took the key. She sat down on the stairs for a few moments to catch her breath and cry, and then she got up and hurried away.

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