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A Tale of Two Cities

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“We have seen nothing else,” returned The Vengeance. “We’ve seen nothing else,” answered The Vengeance.
“We have borne this a long time,” said Madame Defarge, turning her eyes again upon Lucie. “Judge you! Is it likely that the trouble of one wife and mother would be much to us now?” “We have endured this for a long time,” said Madame Defarge, looking at Lucie again. “Judge you! Is it likely that the suffering of one wife and mother would matter much to us now?”
She resumed her knitting and went out. The Vengeance followed. Defarge went last, and closed the door. Madame Defarge went back to her knitting and left. The Vengeance followed. Monsieur Defarge went out last and closed the door.
“Courage, my dear Lucie,” said Mr. Lorry, as he raised her. “Courage, courage! So far all goes well with us—much, much better than it has of late gone with many poor souls. Cheer up, and have a thankful heart.” “Be brave, my dear Lucie,” said Mr. Lorry, picking her up off the ground. “Be brave! So far, all is going well. It’s going much, much better than it has for many less fortunate people. Cheer up, and be thankful.”
“I am not thankless, I hope, but that dreadful woman seems to throw a shadow on me and on all my hopes.” “I am not ungrateful, I hope, but that terrible woman has thrown a dark shadow on my hopes.”
“Tut, tut!” said Mr. Lorry; “what is this despondency in the brave little breast? A shadow indeed! No substance in it, Lucie.” “Tut, tut!” said Mr. Lorry. “Why are you so sad? A shadow? Really? But there is no substance to a shadow, Lucie.”
But the shadow of the manner of these Defarges was dark upon himself, for all that, and in his secret mind it troubled him greatly. But the way the Defarges were acting had thrown a shadow on him too, and what they had said secretly bothered him very much.

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