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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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I went up the bank about fifty yards, and then I doubled on my tracks and slipped back to where my canoe was, a good piece below the house. I jumped in, and was off in a hurry. I went up-stream far enough to make the head of the island, and then started across. I took off the sun-bonnet, for I didn’t want no blinders on then. When I was about the middle I heard the clock begin to strike, so I stops and listens; the sound come faint over the water but clear—eleven. When I struck the head of the island I never waited to blow, though I was most winded, but I shoved right into the timber where my old camp used to be, and started a good fire there on a high and dry spot. I went about fifty yards up the riverbank. Then I turned around and retraced my steps back to the canoe, which was a good ways downstream from the house. I jumped in and hurry away. I went upstream far enough to reach the head of the island, and then I started paddling across. I took off the sunbonnet so that I could have a full view. About the time I reached the middle of the river, I heard the clock strike. I stopped paddling and listened. The sound was faint as it traveled over the water, but it was clear—eleven strikes. I was winded when I reached the head of the island, but I didn’t pause to catch my breath. Instead, I headed right into the woods where my old camp used to be and started a good fire there on a high and dry spot.
Then I jumped in the canoe and dug out for our place, a mile and a half below, as hard as I could go. I landed, and slopped through the timber and up the ridge and into the cavern. There Jim laid, sound asleep on the ground. I roused him out and says: After that, I jumped in the canoe and started paddling as hard as I could toward our new place about a mile and a half downstream. I landed and ran through the woods and up the ridge into the cave. Jim was there, lying fast asleep. I woke him up, and said:
“Git up and hump yourself, Jim! There ain’t a minute to lose. They’re after us!” “Get up and get going, Jim! There’s not a minute to lose. They’re after us!”
Jim never asked no questions, he never said a word; but the way he worked for the next half an hour showed about how he was scared. By that time everything we had in the world was on our raft, and she was ready to be shoved out from the willow cove where she was hid. We put out the camp fire at the cavern the first thing, and didn’t show a candle outside after that. Jim didn’t ask any questions or say a word. The way he worked for the next half an hour demonstrated just how scared he was. Within thirty minutes we had everything we owned on our raft, and we were ready to shove off from the cove of willow trees where it was hidden. We put out the campfire in cave right away. After that, we didn’t even light a candle outside.
I took the canoe out from the shore a little piece, and took a look; but if there was a boat around I couldn’t see it, for stars and shadows ain’t good to see by. Then we got out the raft and slipped along down in the shade, past the foot of the island dead still—never saying a word. I paddled the canoe out from the shore a little ways to see what I could see. If there was a boat nearby, I couldn’t see it by just the light of the stars and shadows. Then we untied the raft and paddled it downstream in the shade, past the foot of the island, as quietly as we could, never saying a word.

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