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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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He see me, and rode up and says: He saw me, rode up to me, and said:
“Whar’d you come f’m, boy? You prepared to die?” “Where’d you come from, boy? Are you prepared to die?”
Then he rode on. I was scared, but a man says: Then he rode on. I was scared, but a man said:
“He don’t mean nothing; he’s always a-carryin’ on like that when he’s drunk. He’s the best naturedest old fool in Arkansaw—never hurt nobody, drunk nor sober.” “He doesn’t mean anything—he’s always carrying on like that when he’s drunk. He’s he most easy going old fool in Arkansas. He never hurt anyone, drunk or sober.”
Boggs rode up before the biggest store in town, and bent his head down so he could see under the curtain of the awning and yells: Boggs rode up to the front of the biggest store in town, and bent his head down so that he could see under the curtain of the awning. Then he yelled:
“Come out here, Sherburn! Come out and meet the man you’ve swindled. You’re the houn’ I’m after, and I’m a-gwyne to have you, too!” “Come out here, Sherburn! Come out and meet the man you’ve swindled! You’re the hound I’m after, and I’m going to have you too!”
And so he went on, calling Sherburn everything he could lay his tongue to, and the whole street packed with people listening and laughing and going on. By and by a proud-looking man about fifty-five—and he was a heap the best dressed man in that town, too—steps out of the store, and the crowd drops back on each side to let him come. He says to Boggs, mighty ca’m and slow—he says: He went on and on, calling Sherburn every name he could think of. The whole street was packed with people listening and laughing. Pretty soon a proud looking man of about fifty-five stepped out the store. He was definitely the best dressed man in that town, and the crowd backed away on each side to let him through. He said to Boggs, very calmly and slowly:
“I’m tired of this, but I’ll endure it till one o’clock. Till one o’clock, mind—no longer. If you open your mouth against me only once after that time you can’t travel so far but I will find you.” “I’m tired of this, but I’ll put up with it until one o’clock. Until one o’clock, mind you—no longer than that. If you say anything against me after one o’clock, I’ll hunt you down wherever you are.”
Then he turns and goes in. The crowd looked mighty sober; nobody stirred, and there warn’t no more laughing. Boggs rode off blackguarding Sherburn as loud as he could yell, all down the street; and pretty soon back he comes and stops before the store, still keeping it up. Some men crowded around him and tried to get him to shut up, but he wouldn’t; they told him it would be one o’clock in about fifteen minutes, and so he MUST go home—he must go right away. But it didn’t do no good. He cussed away with all his might, and throwed his hat down in the mud and rode over it, and pretty soon away he went a-raging down the street again, with his gray hair a-flying. Everybody that could get a chance at him tried their best to coax him off of his horse so they could lock him up and get him sober; but it warn’t no use—up the street he would tear again, and give Sherburn another cussing. By and by somebody says: Then he turned around and went back inside. The crowd looked pretty serious—no one moved and no one laughed anymore. Boggs rode up and down the street swearing at Sherburn as loud as he could, before eventually coming back to the front of the store. Some men crowded around him and tried to shut him up, but he wouldn’t stop. They told him it’d be one o’clock in about fifteen minutes, and that he HAD to stop and go home right away. But it didn’t do any good. He cussed away at Sherburn with all his might, and threw his hat down in the mud and rode over it. Pretty soon he went galloping up and down the street again with his gray hair flying behind him. Everyone who could get near him tried their best to coax him down off his horse so that they could lock him and get him sober, but it wasn’t any use. He’d go galloping up the street again, and swear at Sherburn some more. Pretty soon, someone said:
“Go for his daughter!—quick, go for his daughter; sometimes he’ll listen to her. If anybody can persuade him, she can.” “Go get his daughter! Quick, go get his daughter! Sometimes he’ll listen to her. If anyone can persuade him to stop, it’s her.”
So somebody started on a run. I walked down street a ways and stopped. In about five or ten minutes here comes Boggs again, but not on his horse. He was a-reeling across the street towards me, bare-headed, with a friend on both sides of him a-holt of his arms and hurrying him along. He was quiet, and looked uneasy; and he warn’t hanging back any, but was doing some of the hurrying himself. Somebody sings out: Someone ran off to get her. I walked down the street a ways and stopped. Boggs came back again in about five or ten minutes, but not on his horse. This time he was careening across the street towards me, hatless, with a friend on either side holding his arms and hurrying him away. He was quiet and looked uneasy. He wasn’t putting up a fight, but was hurrying along himself. Then someone called out:
“Boggs!” “Boggs!”
I looked over there to see who said it, and it was that Colonel Sherburn. He was standing perfectly still in the street, and had a pistol raised in his right hand—not aiming it, but holding it out with the barrel tilted up towards the sky. The same second I see a young girl coming on the run, and two men with her. Boggs and the men turned round to see who called him, and when they see the pistol the men jumped to one side, and the pistol-barrel come down slow and steady to a level—both barrels cocked. Boggs throws up both of his hands and says, “O Lord, don’t shoot!” Bang! goes the first shot, and he staggers back, clawing at the air—bang! goes the second one, and he tumbles backwards on to the ground, heavy and solid, with his arms spread out. That young girl screamed out and comes rushing, and down she throws herself on her father, crying, and saying, “Oh, he’s killed him, he’s killed him!” The crowd closed up around them, and shouldered and jammed one another, with their necks stretched, trying to see, and people on the inside trying to shove them back and shouting, “Back, back! give him air, give him air!” I looked over there to see who’d called out his name, and saw that it was Colonel Sherburn. He was standing in the street, perfectly still, and had a pistol raised in his right hand, not aiming it, but holding it out with the barrel titled up toward the sky. That same moment I saw a young girl running over with two men with her. Boggs and the men turned around to see who’d called him, and when the two men saw the pistol, they jumped off to one side. Col. Sherburn lowered the barrel of the pistol slowly and stead until it was level—it was cocked. Boggs threw up his hands and said, “Oh Lord, don’t shoot!” Bang! went the first shot, and Boggs staggered back, clawing at the air. Bang! went the second shot, and this time he tumbled backward to the ground, landing heavily and solidly with his arms spread out. The young girl screamed and rushed over. Crying, she threw herself on her father, and said, “Oh, he’s killed him, he’s killed him!” The crowd closed in around them. People jammed in shoulder to shoulder with their necks stretched out trying to see, while those on the inside tried to shove them back, shouting, “Back! Back! Give him air! Give him air!”
Colonel Sherburn he tossed his pistol on to the ground, and turned around on his heels and walked off. Colonel Sherburn tossed his pistol to the ground, turned around on his heels, and walked off.

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