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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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“Well,” she says, “I’ll run down to breakfast now, and then I’ll start straight for Mr. Lothrop’s.” “Well,” she aid. “I’ll run downstairs to breakfast now, and then I’ll head out for Mr. Lothrop’s immediately after.”
“’Deed, THAT ain’t the ticket, Miss Mary Jane,” I says, “by no manner of means; go BEFORE breakfast.” “No, Miss Mary Jane, that’s not the way to do it. Not at all. You should go BEFORE breakfast.”
“Why?” “Why?”
“What did you reckon I wanted you to go at all for, Miss Mary?” “Why do you think I wanted you to go at all, Miss Mary?”
“Well, I never thought—and come to think, I don’t know. What was it?” “Well, I guess I never thought about it. And come to think of it, I don’t know. Why?”
“Why, it’s because you ain’t one of these leather-face people. I don’t want no better book than what your face is. A body can set down and read it off like coarse print. Do you reckon you can go and face your uncles when they come to kiss you good-morning, and never—” “Why, because you’re not one of those poker-faced people. Your face is just like a book, and anyone would be able to read your face and see that something was wrong. Do you think you’d be able to face your uncles when they come and kiss you good morning and never….”
“There, there, don’t! Yes, I’ll go before breakfast—I’ll be glad to. And leave my sisters with them?” “Stop! Stop! Yes, I’ll go before breakfast—I’ll be glad to. Should I leave my sisters with them?”
“Yes; never mind about them. They’ve got to stand it yet a while. They might suspicion something if all of you was to go. I don’t want you to see them, nor your sisters, nor nobody in this town; if a neighbor was to ask how is your uncles this morning your face would tell something. No, you go right along, Miss Mary Jane, and I’ll fix it with all of them. I’ll tell Miss Susan to give your love to your uncles and say you’ve went away for a few hours for to get a little rest and change, or to see a friend, and you’ll be back to-night or early in the morning.” “Yes. Don’t worry about them. They’ve got to put up with all this a bit longer. The rascals might suspect something if all of you were to go. I don’t want you to see those two or your sisters or anyone in town. If a neighbor asks you how your uncles are this morning, your face would reveal something. No, you go right along to Mr. Lothrop’s, Miss Mary Jane. I’ll settle it all with them. I’ll tell Miss Susan that you’ve gone away for a few hours for a change of scene or to see a friend or something, and she should give your love to your uncles. I’ll tell them that you’ll be back either tonight or early in the morning.”
“Gone to see a friend is all right, but I won’t have my love given to them.” “You can tell them I’ve gone to see a friend, but I won’t have you tell those men that I’ve given my love to them”
“Well, then, it sha’n’t be.” It was well enough to tell HER so—no harm in it. It was only a little thing to do, and no trouble; and it’s the little things that smooths people’s roads the most, down here below; it would make Mary Jane comfortable, and it wouldn’t cost nothing. Then I says: “There’s one more thing—that bag of money.” “Okay then, I won’t say that.” I could tell HER that—what she didn’t know wouldn’t hurt her. It was just a little lie and would’t cause any harm. It’s little things like that that calm people down the most. It would make Mary Jane comfortable, and it wouldn’t make any difference. Then I said, “There’s one more thing—that bag of money.”
“Well, they’ve got that; and it makes me feel pretty silly to think HOW they got it.” “Well, they’ve got that. It makes me feel pretty silly to think HOW they got it too.”
“No, you’re out, there. They hain’t got it.” “No, you’re wrong there. They don’t have it.”
“Why, who’s got it?” “What? Well, then who has it?”
“I wish I knowed, but I don’t. I HAD it, because I stole it from them; and I stole it to give to you; and I know where I hid it, but I’m afraid it ain’t there no more. I’m awful sorry, Miss Mary Jane, I’m just as sorry as I can be; but I done the best I could; I did honest. I come nigh getting caught, and I had to shove it into the first place I come to, and run—and it warn’t a good place.” “I wish I knew, but I don’t. I HAD it because I stole it from them to give to you. I know where I hid it, but I’m afraid it isn’t there any more. I’m awfully sorry, Miss Mary Jane. I’m just as sorry as I can be. But I did the best I could—honestly I did. I came pretty close to getting caught, and I had to shove it into the first place I could and then run—and it wasn’t a very good hiding place.”
“Oh, stop blaming yourself—it’s too bad to do it, and I won’t allow it—you couldn’t help it; it wasn’t your fault. Where did you hide it?” “Oh, stop blaming yourself—it’s not good for you, and I won’t allow it. Besides, you couldn’t help it—it wasn’t your fault. Where did you hide it?”
I didn’t want to set her to thinking about her troubles again; and I couldn’t seem to get my mouth to tell her what would make her see that corpse laying in the coffin with that bag of money on his stomach. So for a minute I didn’t say nothing; then I says: I didn’t want her to start thinking about all her troubles again, and I couldn’t think of how to tell her that the bag of money was on the stomach of her father’s corpse in the coffin. So for a minute I didn’t say anything. Then I said:
“I’d ruther not TELL you where I put it, Miss Mary Jane, if you don’t mind letting me off; but I’ll write it for you on a piece of paper, and you can read it along the road to Mr. Lothrop’s, if you want to. Do you reckon that ’ll do?” “If you don’t mind, I’d rather NOT tell you where I put it, Miss Mary Jane. But I’ll write where I put it on a piece of paper, and you can read it when you’re on the road to Mr. Lothrop’s if you want to. Do you think that will do?
“Oh, yes.” “Oh, yes.”
So I wrote: “I put it in the coffin. It was in there when you was crying there, away in the night. I was behind the door, and I was mighty sorry for you, Miss Mary Jane.” So I wrote down, “I put it in the coffin. It was in there when you were crying over it in the middle of the night. I was behind the door, and I felt very sorry for you, Miss Mary Jane.”
It made my eyes water a little to remember her crying there all by herself in the night, and them devils laying there right under her own roof, shaming her and robbing her; and when I folded it up and give it to her I see the water come into her eyes, too; and she shook me by the hand, hard, and says: It made my eyes water a little to remember her crying there all by herself that night and to think of those devils lying in bed right under her own roof, cheating her and robbing her. When I folded the paper and gave it to her, I saw that her eyes were starting to water too. She shook me hard by the hand and said:
“GOOD-bye. I’m going to do everything just as you’ve told me; and if I don’t ever see you again, I sha’n’t ever forget you and I’ll think of you a many and a many a time, and I’ll PRAY for you, too!"—and she was gone. “GOOD-bye. I’m going to do everything just like you told me. And if I never see you again, I won’t ever forget you. I’ll think of you many, many times, and I’ll PRAY for you, too.” And then she was gone.

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