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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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“Well, you can’t GET your nigger, that’s all—so dry up your blubbering. Looky here—do you think YOU’D venture to blow on us? Blamed if I think I’d trust you. Why, if you WAS to blow on us—” “Well, you can GET your n-----, sure enough, so quit your blubbering. Look here—do you think YOU’D rat us out? I’ll be darned if I trust you. Why, if you were to tell on us….”
He stopped, but I never see the duke look so ugly out of his eyes before. I went on a-whimpering, and says: He stopped, but I’ve never seen the duke’s eyes look so ugly before. I kept on wimpering, and said:
“I don’t want to blow on nobody; and I ain’t got no time to blow, nohow. I got to turn out and find my nigger.” “I don’t want to tattle on anyone, and I don’t have time to rat on anyone anyway. I’ve got to go and find my n------.”
He looked kinder bothered, and stood there with his bills fluttering on his arm, thinking, and wrinkling up his forehead. At last he says: He looked a little bothered by this, and stood there with his handbills fluttering under his arm, just thinking and wrinkling his forhead. Finally he said:
“I’ll tell you something. We got to be here three days. If you’ll promise you won’t blow, and won’t let the nigger blow, I’ll tell you where to find him.” “I’ll tell you something. We’re going to be here for three days. If you promise not to tell on us and that you won’t let that n----- tell on us, I’ll tell you where you can find him.”
So I promised, and he says: So I promised, and he said:
“A farmer by the name of Silas Ph—” and then he stopped. You see, he started to tell me the truth; but when he stopped that way, and begun to study and think again, I reckoned he was changing his mind. And so he was. He wouldn’t trust me; he wanted to make sure of having me out of the way the whole three days. So pretty soon he says: “There’s a farmer by the name of Silas Ph—“ and then he stopped. He’d started to tell me the truth, you see, but when stopped in mid sentence like that and begun to think some more, I figured he had changed his mind. And he had—he wouldn’t trust me. He wanted to make sure that I’d be out of the way for the next three days. After a minute or so, he said:
“The man that bought him is named Abram Foster—Abram G. Foster—and he lives forty mile back here in the country, on the road to Lafayette.” “The man that bought him is named Abram Foster—Abram G. Foster. He lives forty miles out in the country, on the road to the town of Lafayette.”
“All right,” I says, “I can walk it in three days. And I’ll start this very afternoon.” “All right,” I said. “I can walk that in three days. And I’ll start this afternoon.”
“No you wont, you’ll start NOW; and don’t you lose any time about it, neither, nor do any gabbling by the way. Just keep a tight tongue in your head and move right along, and then you won’t get into trouble with US, d’ye hear?” “No, you won’t. You’ll start NOW. And don’t lose any time, either, and don’t go chitchatting along the way. Just keep your mouth shut and keep moving right along, and then you won’t get into any trouble with US, you hear?”
That was the order I wanted, and that was the one I played for. I wanted to be left free to work my plans. That was exactly what I wanted to hear, and the thing I’d been trying to get him to say. I wanted to be left alone so that I could put my plan in action.
“So clear out,” he says; “and you can tell Mr. Foster whatever you want to. Maybe you can get him to believe that Jim IS your nigger—some idiots don’t require documents—leastways I’ve heard there’s such down South here. And when you tell him the handbill and the reward’s bogus, maybe he’ll believe you when you explain to him what the idea was for getting ’em out. Go ’long now, and tell him anything you want to; but mind you don’t work your jaw any BETWEEN here and there.” “So move out,” he said. “And you can tell Mr. Foster whatever you want to. Maybe you can get him to believe that Jim IS your n-----—some idiots don’t require documents when buying them. Well, that’s what I hear goes on in the South here. And when you tell him that the handbill and the reward money aren’t real, maybe he’ll believe you. You can explain to him why we’d made them in the first place. Tell him anything you like—just don’t say anything to anyone BETWEEN here and there.”
So I left, and struck for the back country. I didn’t look around, but I kinder felt like he was watching me. But I knowed I could tire him out at that. I went straight out in the country as much as a mile before I stopped; then I doubled back through the woods towards Phelps’. I reckoned I better start in on my plan straight off without fooling around, because I wanted to stop Jim’s mouth till these fellows could get away. I didn’t want no trouble with their kind. I’d seen all I wanted to of them, and wanted to get entirely shut of them. So I left, and headed out for the backcountry. I didn’t look around, but I felt like he was watching me. I knew I could tire him out pretty quickly, so I went straight out into the countryside for about a mile before I stopped. Then I doubled back through the woods towards the Phelps farm. I figured I’d better start working on plan right away and not fool around. I wanted to make sure Jim didn’t say anything before the king and the duke got away. I didn’t want any more trouble with them. I’d seen all I wanted of them, and I wanted to be done with them forever.

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