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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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“What’s the vittles for? Going to feed the dogs?” “What’s the food for? Going to feed the dogs?”
The nigger kind of smiled around gradually over his face, like when you heave a brickbat in a mud-puddle, and he says: A slow smile spread over the n-----’s face, kind of like how ripples spread over the water after you throw a brick in. He said:
“Yes, Mars Sid, A dog. Cur’us dog, too. Does you want to go en look at ’im?” “Yes, Master Sid—a dog. Pretty interesting dog, too. Do you want to go and look at him?”
“Yes.” “Yes.”
I hunched Tom, and whispers: I pulled Tom aside and whispered:
“You going, right here in the daybreak? THAT warn’t the plan.” “You’re going right in there in the midde of the day? THAT wasn’t the plan.”
“No, it warn’t; but it’s the plan NOW.” “No it wasn’t. But it’s the plan NOW.”
So, drat him, we went along, but I didn’t like it much. When we got in we couldn’t hardly see anything, it was so dark; but Jim was there, sure enough, and could see us; and he sings out: Darn him. So we went along, but I didn’t like it much. It was so dark when we went inside, that I couldn’t see anything. But sure enough, Jim was there, and he could see us too. He cried out:
“Why, HUCK! En good LAN’! ain’ dat Misto Tom?” “HUCK! And my word! Isn’t that Mister Tom?”
I just knowed how it would be; I just expected it. I didn’t know nothing to do; and if I had I couldn’t a done it, because that nigger busted in and says: I knew this would happen, and I’d expected it to. But I didn’t know what to do—and even if I had, the n----- jumped in said:
“Why, de gracious sakes! do he know you genlmen?” “Land’s sake! Does he know you gentlemen?”
We could see pretty well now. Tom he looked at the nigger, steady and kind of wondering, and says: We could see pretty well now. Tom looked at the n----- slowly with a puzzled look on his face and said:
“Does WHO know us?” “Does WHO know us?”
“Why, dis-yer runaway nigger.” “Why… this runaway n-----.”
“I don’t reckon he does; but what put that into your head?” “I don’t think he does. What would put that idea into your head?”
“What PUT it dar? Didn’ he jis’ dis minute sing out like he knowed you?” “What PUT it there? Didn’t he just cry out a minute ago that he knew you?”
Tom says, in a puzzled-up kind of way: Tom said in a puzzled kind of way:
“Well, that’s mighty curious. WHO sung out? WHEN did he sing out? WHAT did he sing out?” And turns to me, perfectly ca’m, and says, “Did YOU hear anybody sing out?” “Well that’s pretty funny. WHO cried out? And WHEN did he cry out? And WHAT did he cry out?” He turned to me perfectly calm and said, “Did YOU hear anyone cry out?”
Of course there warn’t nothing to be said but the one thing; so I says: Of course, I could only say one thing, so I said:
“No; I ain’t heard nobody say nothing.” “No. I didn’t hear anyone say anything.”
Then he turns to Jim, and looks him over like he never see him before, and says: Then Tom turned to Jim. He looked him over as if he’d never seen him before, and said:
“Did you sing out?” “Did you cry out?”
“No, sah,” says Jim; “I hain’t said nothing, sah.” “No, sir,” Jim said. “I didn’t say anything, sir.”
“Not a word?” “Not a word?”
“No, sah, I hain’t said a word.” “No, sir. I didn’t say a word.”
“Did you ever see us before?” “Have you ever seen us before?”
“No, sah; not as I knows on.” “No, sir. Not that I know of.”
So Tom turns to the nigger, which was looking wild and distressed, and says, kind of severe: So Tom turned to the n-----, who was looking pretty frantic and worried. He said, kind of severely:
“What do you reckon’s the matter with you, anyway? What made you think somebody sung out?” “What’s the matter with you, anyway? What made you think someone had cried out?”
“Oh, it’s de dad-blame’ witches, sah, en I wisht I was dead, I do. Dey’s awluz at it, sah, en dey do mos’ kill me, dey sk’yers me so. Please to don’t tell nobody ’bout it sah, er ole Mars Silas he’ll scole me; ’kase he say dey AIN’T no witches. I jis’ wish to goodness he was heah now—DEN what would he say! I jis’ bet he couldn’ fine no way to git aroun’ it DIS time. But it’s awluz jis’ so; people dat’s SOT, stays sot; dey won’t look into noth’n’en fine it out f’r deyselves, en when YOU fine it out en tell um ’bout it, dey doan’ b’lieve you.” “Oh, it’s the darn witches, sir! I wish I were dead, I really do. They’re always at it, sir, and it’s killing me. They scare me so much. Please don’t tell anyone about it, sir, or old Master Silas will scold me. He says there aren’t any witches. I just wish to God that he were here now—THEN what would he say? I bet he couldn’t ignore them this time. But it’s always like this—people who’re set stay set. They don’t investigate or try to find out anything for themselves. And when YOU find it out and tell them about it, they don’t believe you.”
Tom give him a dime, and said we wouldn’t tell nobody; and told him to buy some more thread to tie up his wool with; and then looks at Jim, and says: Tom gave him a dime, and said we wouldn’t tell anyone. He also told him to buy some more thread to tie up his hair with. Then he looked at Jim and said:
“I wonder if Uncle Silas is going to hang this nigger. If I was to catch a nigger that was ungrateful enough to run away, I wouldn’t give him up, I’d hang him.” And whilst the nigger stepped to the door to look at the dime and bite it to see if it was good, he whispers to Jim and says: “I wonder if Uncle Silas is going to hang this n-----. If I were to catch a n----- that was ungrateful enough to run away, I wouldn’t give him away—I’d hang him.” While the n----- stepped into the doorway to look at the dime in the sunlight and bite it to see if it was genuine, Tom whispered to Jim:
“Don’t ever let on to know us. And if you hear any digging going on nights, it’s us; we’re going to set you free.” “Don’t ever say that you know us. And if you hear any digging going on at night, it’s us. We’re going to set you free.”
Jim only had time to grab us by the hand and squeeze it; then the nigger come back, and we said we’d come again some time if the nigger wanted us to; and he said he would, more particular if it was dark, because the witches went for him mostly in the dark, and it was good to have folks around then. Jim had just enough time to grab us each by the hand and squeeze them before the n----- came back. We said we’d come back again if the n----- wanted us to, and he said he’d like that, especially when it was dark since the witches usually went after him at night. He said it was good to have other people around.

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