Coriolanus

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

FIRST LORD

Bear from hence his body;
And mourn you for him: let him be regarded
As the most noble corse that ever herald
170Did follow to his urn.

FIRST LORD

Step away from his body and mourn for him. Let him be considered as the most noble corpse that a procession has ever followed to a grave.

SECOND LORD

His own impatience
Takes from Aufidius a great part of blame.
Let’s make the best of it.

SECOND LORD

His own fury frees Aufidius from most of the blame. Let’s make the best of it.

AUFIDIUS

My rage is gone;
175And I am struck with sorrow. Take him up.
Help, three o’ the chiefest soldiers; I’ll be one.
Beat thou the drum, that it speak mournfully:
Trail your steel pikes. Though in this city he
Hath widow’d and unchilded many a one,
180Which to this hour bewail the injury,
Yet he shall have a noble memory. Assist.

AUFIDIUS

My rage is gone, and I’m full of sorrow. Lift him up. Help, three of the best soldiers. I’ll be the fourth. Play the drum in a mournful beat. Lay down your steel spears. Even though he has killed the husbands and children of many people in this city and they’re still mourning their loss, we’ll give him a noble memorial. Help me.
Exeunt, bearing the body of CORIOLANUS. A dead march sounded
All exit, carrying the body of CORIOLANUS. A death march sounds.