Henry IV, Part 1

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

PRINCE HENRY

85Where shall we take a purse tomorrow, Jack?

PRINCE HENRY

Where should we go stealing tomorrow, Jack?

FALSTAFF

Zounds, where thou wilt, lad. I’ll make one. An I do not, call me villain and baffle me.

FALSTAFF

For God’s sake, wherever you want, boy. I’ll be one of the gang. If I’m not, call me evildoer and string me up.

PRINCE HENRY

I see a good amendment of life in thee, from praying to purse-taking.

PRINCE HENRY

I see you’ve changed your life, alright. From praying to pursesnatching.

FALSTAFF

90Why, Hal, ’tis my vocation, Hal. 'Tis no sin for a man to labor in his vocation.

FALSTAFF

It’s my calling, Hal. It’s no sin for a man to follow his calling.
Enter POINS
POINS enters.
Poins!—Now shall we know if Gadshill have set a match. O, if men were to be saved by merit, what hole in hell were hot enough for him? This is the most omnipotent villain that ever cried “Stand!” to a true man.
Poins! Now we’ll find out whether Mr. Gadshill has planned a robbery. If good deeds bring a man to heaven, there’s no hell hot enough for Poins. This is the most incredible villain, whoever said “Stick 'em up!” to an honest man.

PRINCE HENRY

Good morrow, Ned.

PRINCE HENRY

Morning, Ned.

POINS

Good morrow, sweet Hal.—What says Monsieur Remorse? What says Sir John Sack-and-Sugar? Jack, how agrees the devil and thee about thy soul that thou soldest him on Good Friday last for a cup of Madeira and a cold capon’s leg?

POINS

Morning, sweet Hal. What’s Mr. Feelbad got to say? What’s going on, Sir John, Wino Jack? How’s your deal with the devil coming along? You sold him your soul last Good Friday for some cold chicken and a glass of cheap wine, right?

PRINCE HENRY

Sir John stands to his word. The devil shall have his bargain, for he was never yet a breaker of proverbs. He will give the devil his due.

PRINCE HENRY

The devil will get what’s coming to him. Sir John’s a man of his word, and he never disagrees with a proverb. He will “give the devil his due.”

POINS

(to FALSTAFF )Then art thou damned for keeping thy word with the devil.

POINS

(to FALSTAFF )Then you’re damned for keeping your word with the devil.