Henry IV Part 2

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

WESTMORELAND

That is intended in the General’s name.
I muse you make so slight a question.

WESTMORELAND

That goes without saying. I’m amazed you’d even ask such a foolish question.

ARCHBISHOP

Then take, my Lord of Westmoreland, this schedule,
For this contains our general grievances.
170Each several article herein redressed,
All members of our cause, both here and hence,
That are insinewed to this action,
Acquitted by a true substantial form
And present execution of our wills
175To us and to our purposes confined,
We come within our awful banks again
And knit our powers to the arm of peace.

ARCHBISHOP

Then, Lord Westmoreland, take this document. It lists our grievances. If each complaint listed here is addressed, and if everyone on our side, both here and elsewhere, is granted a full pardon and immediate satisfaction of our demands, then we’ll return to our own boundaries again and work together for the cause of peace.

WESTMORELAND

This will I show the General. Please you, lords,
In sight of both our battles we may meet,
180And either end in peace, which God so frame,
Or to the place of difference call the swords
Which must decide it.

WESTMORELAND

I’ll show this to the general. Please, let’s meet at a place where both our armies can see us. Then either let our talks end in peace—God willing!—or let us take the fight to the battlefield where it will be decided.

ARCHBISHOP

   My lord, we will do so.

ARCHBISHOP

My lord, we will do so.
Exit WESTMORELAND
WESTMORELAND exits.

MOWBRAY

There is a thing within my bosom tells me
That no conditions of our peace can stand.

MOWBRAY

Something in my heart tells me that no peace we agree to could possibly last.

HASTINGS

185Fear you not that. If we can make our peace
Upon such large terms and so absolute
As our conditions shall consist upon,
Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains.

HASTINGS

Don’t worry about that. If we can come to terms that are as comprehensive as the ones we’re insisting upon, then the peace will be as durable as rocky mountains.

MOWBRAY

Yea, but our valuation shall be such
190That every slight and false-derivèd cause,
Yea, every idle, nice, and wanton reason,
Shall to the King taste of this action,

MOWBRAY

Yes, but in the future the King will think so poorly of us that every little slight, every false accusation, every tiny, silly, frivolous thing will seem to him to be a revival of this rebellion. Even if we were as devoted to the King as martyrs are to their causes, he’ll regard us so skeptically that even the good things we do for him