Henry V

by: William Shakespeare

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That nothing do but meditate on blood,
To swearing and stern looks, diffused attire,
And everything that seems unnatural.
Which to reduce into our former favor
65You are assembled, and my speech entreats
That I may know the let why gentle peace
Should not expel these inconveniences
And bless us with her former qualities.
children have lost—or no longer have time to learn—skills that should be a credit to our country. They grow like savages—like soldiers who meditate on nothing but blood—surrounded by swearing and stern looks, ragged clothing and everything unnatural. It’s to reverse all this, so we can once again become as we were, that you have all been brought together; therefore I demand to know why gentle peace should not banish these troubles and bless us with her former qualities.

KING HENRY

If, Duke of Burgundy, you would the peace,
70Whose want gives growth to th' imperfections
Which you have cited, you must buy that peace
With full accord to all our just demands,
Whose tenors and particular effects
You have, enscheduled briefly, in your hands.

KING HENRY

Duke of Burgundy, if you want peace, the lack of which creates these misfortunes you describe, you must purchase it buy agreeing across-the-board to all our very just demands. You hold the details and particulars of our terms, briefly enumerated, before you in your hands.

BURGUNDY

75The king hath heard them, to the which as yet
There is no answer made.

BURGUNDY

The king has heard them, but as yet has made no answer.

KING HENRY

Well then, the peace which you before so urged
Lies in his answer.

KING HENRY

Well, the peace you pleaded for so eloquently just now lies in his answer.

KING OF FRANCE

I have but with a cursitory eye
80O'erglanced the articles. Pleaseth your Grace
To appoint some of your council presently
To sit with us once more with better heed
To resurvey them, we will suddenly
Pass our accept and peremptory answer.

KING OF FRANCE

I’ve only given the articles a cursory glance. If your Grace would kindly appoint some members of your council to sit with me once more and go over them more carefully, I will give my answer and acceptance right away.

KING HENRY

85Brother, we shall.—Go, uncle Exeter,
And brother Clarence, and you, brother Gloucester,
Warwick and Huntingdon, go with the king
And take with you free power to ratify,
Augment, or alter, as your wisdoms best
90Shall see advantageable for our dignity,
Anything in or out of our demands,

KING HENRY

Brother, I shall. Go, uncle Exeter, and brother Clarence, and you, brother Gloucester, Warwick and Huntingdon, go with the king. You have full power to confirm, change, or add to any of my demands in any