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Confessions

St. Augustine

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Full Bibliographic Citation

MLA

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Confessions.” SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. n.d.. Web. 2 Sept. 2014.

The Chicago Manual of Style

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Confessions.” SparkNotes LLC. n.d.. http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/confessionsaug/ (accessed September 2, 2014).

APA

SparkNotes Editors. (n.d.). SparkNote on Confessions. Retrieved September 2, 2014, from http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/confessionsaug/

In Text Citation

MLA

“Their conversation is awkward, especially when she mentions Wickham, a subject Darcy clearly wishes to avoid” (SparkNotes Editors).

APA

“Their conversation is awkward, especially when she mentions Wickham, a subject Darcy clearly wishes to avoid” (SparkNotes Editors, n.d.).

Footnote

The Chicago Manual of Style

Chicago requires the use of footnotes, rather than parenthetical citations, in conjunction with a list of works cited when dealing with literature.

1 SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Confessions.” SparkNotes LLC. n.d.. http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/confessionsaug/ (accessed September 2, 2014).


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nonsense

by hhd618, August 26, 2012

The book was in old English and asked so many questions about god and toward god, which could not be answered. It's meaningless to write Book 1 because he only praised the god rather than the ordinary people who gave him knowledge to write and learn. Without human beings, how could he get over all this obstacles on his way communicating toward god. He is nothing special, and he cannot be too complacent saying that he knows too much about the god.

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2 out of 69 people found this helpful

Maybe not...

by Kneish, October 16, 2012

Well, being that his view is theocentric, perhaps Augustine sees the human beings as God's helpers. Meaning that if it weren't for God the human being wouldn't have been present at all. So them being present in his life was more of an effort on God's part than it actually was for those who helped. Yes, it wouldnt hurt to give the helpers some acknowledgement for the roles they played, but to Augustine they were probably smaller parts to a greater plan the God orchestrated. Therefore, God actually would deserve the ultimate praise.

0 Comments

12 out of 13 people found this helpful

As far as Plato and the Meno go...

by IAcceptChaos, October 23, 2013

This SparkNote is wrong. Plato didn't really believe that "learning is a kind of remembering, in which the soul rediscovers a truth it knew before birth." This is a dialectical approach that Socrates uses on Meno to disprove the famous "Meno's Paradox," in which Meno asks Socrates "How will you look for virtue if you do not know what it is? If you should meet with it, how will you know that this is the thing you did not know?" I can't believe that SparkNotes would let inaccurate information like this be part of the foundation for another text.

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1 out of 6 people found this helpful

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