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On Liberty

John Stuart Mill

Contents

Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion (Part 1)

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Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion (Part 1)

Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion (Part 1)

Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion (Part 1)

Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion (Part 1)

Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion (Part 1)

Finally, it is worth thinking about the importance of Mill's assumption in the existence of truth to his justification for freedom of opinion. If no one could be wrong or right, would this require tolerance and respect of difference, or could the strongest opinion simply try to defeat all others? Mill does not try to answer this question, because the existence of truth is assumed throughout. However, thinking about such issues is important in seeing how persuasive Mill can be to people who do not share all of his assumptions.

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Mill & Truth

by JustMeandMyBalls, December 06, 2013

In the last paragraph of the commentary there is a discussion of Mill's belief in the existence of truth. It is my opinion that the way this last paragraph was written does not adequately represent Mill's understanding of truth. The commentator confuses moral truth and utilitarian truth. The commentary assumes truth on the basis of simple right or wrong, but Mill was a utilitarian. I believe Mill's understanding of truth is one where the 'trueness' of an idea is weighed by its ability to serve the greater good. (The effectual utility that th... Read more

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88 out of 92 people found this helpful

To the gentleman with the balls

by Jilani-Sparknotes-Writer, November 19, 2016

Oh ok my bad.

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1 out of 1 people found this helpful

To the gentleman with the balls

by Jilani-Sparknotes-Writer, November 19, 2016

I guess you're right, my bad.

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