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Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980)

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Summary & Analysis

Full Bibliographic Citation

MLA

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980).” SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. 2005. Web. 12 Dec. 2014.

The Chicago Manual of Style

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980).” SparkNotes LLC. 2005. http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/sartre/ (accessed December 12, 2014).

APA

SparkNotes Editors. (2005). SparkNote on Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980). Retrieved December 12, 2014, from http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/sartre/

In Text Citation

MLA

“Their conversation is awkward, especially when she mentions Wickham, a subject Darcy clearly wishes to avoid” (SparkNotes Editors).

APA

“Their conversation is awkward, especially when she mentions Wickham, a subject Darcy clearly wishes to avoid” (SparkNotes Editors, 2005).

Footnote

The Chicago Manual of Style

Chicago requires the use of footnotes, rather than parenthetical citations, in conjunction with a list of works cited when dealing with literature.

1 SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980).” SparkNotes LLC. 2005. http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/sartre/ (accessed December 12, 2014).


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the individual nonetheless projects himself

by ThomYorkesLazyEye, December 24, 2013

I became confused at ''the individual nonetheless projects himself by ascribing meaning to, or taking meaning from, his concrete characteristics and thus negating them''. What does it actually mean when you say ''projects'' and how this relates to taking/ascribing meaning? I'm not clear on what that actually entails... and as well, how does this lead to negation?

Free Will

by ThomYorkesLazyEye, December 24, 2013

Another question, it seems to me that Sartre's philosophy is based on the assumption of free will. Is this true? If so, how can he be sure free will exists or does he just take for granted that it does? If not, then I must have completely misunderstood the whole article.

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CDR - the individual and socxiety according to Sartre

by eumenades, January 06, 2014

This comment is rather long but it attempts to fill in some of the gaps left by the Spark Notes web description.

In the Critique of Dialectical Reason Sartre explains that the practico-inert, as man-made physical substance, is the major force in maintaining social control when run by hegemonies seeking to limit human freedom. Sartre conceives a notional progression running from the lone individual, to the fusing group, to the pledged group, to the organisation, to the ossified institutions that surround us all, thus giving the reader ... Read more

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12 out of 12 people found this helpful

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