Search Menu

Cymbeline

William Shakespeare

Contents

Act V, scene v

page 2 of 2

Act V, scene v

Page 1

Page 2

Act V, scene v

Act V, scene v

Act V, scene v

Yet while all the characters may be reconciled here, two significant difficulties remain for the audience. One is Posthumus' manifest unworthiness to marry the wonderful Imogen, although the playwright does allow him one good line when they embrace: "Hang there like fruit, my soul," he cries, "Till the tree die! (V.v.263-64)." Then again, no other obvious candidates for Imogen's hand present themselves, and Shakespeare is famous for marrying his heroines off to callow or unimpressive men, so Posthumus is in good company. Less forgivable is Cymbeline's peculiar decision, after a bloody battle in which his army triumphed, to restore the payment of tribute to Rome. This has the effect of making all the political action of the play seem a little ridiculous, and one has the feeling that Shakespeare is laughing behind his hand--whether at his characters or at the audience, it is hard to say.

Page 1

Page 2

More Help

Previous Next
My scissors and paste and the real Shakespeare theory.

by ReadingShakespeareby450th, October 24, 2013

I just finished Cymbeline in quest to read all Bard's plays by next April. Entertaining play, lots of twists, and I have a theory. In case you're interested, check it out on my blog of the play:

http://ow.ly/q8TWL

0 Comments

3 out of 3 people found this helpful

essay help

by josephbanks, August 10, 2017

As a student athlete I’m always on the grind at basketball practice and I’ve been really short on time all through high school. I usually order a research paper or English essay here and there. The website is called

https://digitalessay.net

and they really help me out, man. Don’t know where I’d be without it.