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Henry VI Part 1

William Shakespeare

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Act V, Scene vi

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Act V, Scene vi

Act V, Scene vi

Act V, Scene vi

Act V, Scene vi

This scene's portrayal of the famous events leading up to Joan of Arc's death differs somewhat from other accounts. Some stories show Joan as dying for her alleged heresies and her claim to be able to communicate with heavenly beings; others focus on her sentencers' fear of her unconventional life and her warrior-woman status. Yet York and Warwick order her death for no particular reason, it seems; they merely want to be rid of her as an enemy.

Joan's pleas for her life strip her of dignity. First, she insists she is a holy virgin and that to kill her will be to invoke the wrath of heaven. But when they lead her to the bonfire, she changes her story and claims she is pregnant. She desperately lists off French nobles who could be her child's father, thus, rendering her story entirely implausible and further encouraging the English to have her killed. The mythical and romantic image of Joan of Arc, the girl who is perhaps mad, perhaps really hearing heavenly instructions, here takes the form of this pathetic young girl so afraid of death that she will invoke all aspects of femininity--from virginity to pregnancy--and in doing so sacrifice her integrity. But all reminders of her femininity do nothing to save her; her "masculine" brutality against the English remains too clear in the minds of her judges.

Meanwhile, the French accept the peace offer but clearly intend only to keep the treaty as long as it suits them. Hence, even international contracts seem to have lost all semblance of honor and integrity, just as the codes of individual warriors' conduct have given way to self-serving ambition.

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ACT V, SCENE VI QUIZ

Who is the shepherd who attends Joan’s trial?
Alençon in disguise
Joan’s husband
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A Young King and the Dangers of a Power Vacuum

by ReadingShakespearefor450th, April 30, 2013

I finished reading and blogged on Henry VI, Part One in effort to read all Shakespeare by April 2014. If it's of interest, my blog link follows:

http://ow.ly/kA2g5

0 Comments

1 out of 1 people found this helpful

essay help

by josephbanks, August 10, 2017

Essay writing was never my forte as English isn’t my first language but because I was good at math so they put me into Honors English. I really couldn’t be assed with reading King Lear and then writing a 5,000 word paper on it so I looked up essay services and

https://digitalessay.net

was the first link to come up. I was kind of shocked with the quality of the paper they gave me. I received a very articulate and well-written piece of writing for like $20. Recommended it to a bunch of my foreign friends and now they use it too.

Good play.

by MariaDPettiford, October 10, 2017

As a brief description for everyone who hasn't read it yet - Henry VI, Part 1, often referred to as 1 Henry VI, is a history play by William Shakespeare, and possibly Christopher Marlowe and/or Thomas Nashe, believed to have been written in 1591 and set during the lifetime of King Henry VI of England. Personally I liked it.

https://homework-writer.com/blog/who-invented-homework