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Henry VI Part 1

William Shakespeare

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Act III, Scenes vi-viii

page 2 of 2

Act III, Scenes vi-viii

Act III, Scenes vi-viii

Act III, Scenes vi-viii

Act III, Scenes vi-viii

Act III, Scenes vi-viii

Joan's tactics against Burgundy in these scenes do make a strong case against the old style of chivalrous warfare. Why did Burgundy come so trustingly to speak with his enemy? Presumably he, being an honorable man, thought the French would act honorably, too--that there was no harm in having a reasonable conversation with his enemy, since they weren't actually fighting at the time. But the dangers in such a move seem obvious.

In Joan's modern version of battle, the war is always going on, even when it's less a pitched battle than a war of wits. And in this case she wins, convincing Burgundy in a few paragraphs to stop fighting against his countrymen (Burgundy was a French lord who sided with the English)) and to join the French. And he is unable to resist. Was her rhetoric so convincing or did she trick him in some way with her magical powers? Either way, the upright and noble Talbot would never have suspected anyone of such a sneaky tactic as luring a warrior to change sides; thus, he will fall to Joan.

The argument between Basset and Vernon shows that the struggle between followers of the white rose and the red rose has crossed the Channel, and it will threaten the coming battle. Vernon and Basset know they are forbidden to fight with each other, but their mutual hate is so intense that they will find other ways to harm each other. The battlefield will probably end up being the site of their argument's climax; who can stop them from fighting each other in the middle of a bloody struggle between the British and the French? Hence, the British forces will be divided against each other, weaker than ever against the French.

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Where do Talbot and Burgundy intend to travel after the burial of Bedford?
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Paris
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A Young King and the Dangers of a Power Vacuum

by ReadingShakespearefor450th, April 30, 2013

I finished reading and blogged on Henry VI, Part One in effort to read all Shakespeare by April 2014. If it's of interest, my blog link follows:

http://ow.ly/kA2g5

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1 out of 1 people found this helpful

essay help

by josephbanks, August 10, 2017

Essay writing was never my forte as English isn’t my first language but because I was good at math so they put me into Honors English. I really couldn’t be assed with reading King Lear and then writing a 5,000 word paper on it so I looked up essay services and

https://digitalessay.net

was the first link to come up. I was kind of shocked with the quality of the paper they gave me. I received a very articulate and well-written piece of writing for like $20. Recommended it to a bunch of my foreign friends and now they use it too.

Good play.

by MariaDPettiford, October 10, 2017

As a brief description for everyone who hasn't read it yet - Henry VI, Part 1, often referred to as 1 Henry VI, is a history play by William Shakespeare, and possibly Christopher Marlowe and/or Thomas Nashe, believed to have been written in 1591 and set during the lifetime of King Henry VI of England. Personally I liked it.

https://homework-writer.com/blog/who-invented-homework