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Measure for Measure

William Shakespeare

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Act II, Scenes ii-iv

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Act II, Scenes ii-iv

Act II, Scenes ii-iv

Act II, Scenes ii-iv

Act II, Scenes ii-iv

Measure for Measure reaches its height of tension early, with the encounter between Isabella and Angelo and the issues that their meeting raises. Angelo find himself suddenly vulnerable to the same sinful desires for which he is having Claudio put to death. This changes his position completely; no longer on a moral pedestal, he must instead spend his time avoiding culpability rather than carrying out the law.

Lucio seems to comprehend Angelo's vulnerability from the start, encouraging Isabella to touch him and be less cold. Lucio is encouraging Isabella to exploit her femininity to convince Angelo. In a way, he is even encouraging her to offer herself as his sexual object in order to save her brother's life. Lucio may well know that Angelo would respond by propositioning her, and he may expect her to accept, just as her brother will when she explains the dilemma to him. Only Isabella understands fornication to be a deadly sin, which is why the thought is so repulsive to her.

The Duke enjoys his newfound power to absolve sinners as a friar. He shows natural sympathy towards Juliet, and it is clear that he would be more merciful in Angelo's place, but that he is not against Angelo's actions. Already we see the Duke's desire to operate power from the inside, investigating the various characters in his disguise and determining from the evidence they provide what the best course of action will be. The Duke is the only character who appears in almost every location in the play; his hand is active everywhere, and he is pulling most of the strings.

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ACT II, SCENES II-IV QUIZ

Who or what does Isabella ask Angelo to condemn, instead of Claudio?
Juliet
Mistress Overdone
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Shakespeare Blog

by DanMitchell23, March 21, 2013

A view on Measure for Measure...

http://inbetweenthelines1.wordpress.com/2013/03/07/shakespeare-play-measure-for-measure/

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2 out of 2 people found this helpful

A few things to note...

by Hayley1818, April 23, 2013

It's a good idea to note that Lucio is the one who finds outs that Claudio is being arrested, and Lucio is the one who goes to Isabella, for Claudio, to ask for her help. Lucio's main appearance is basically for comic relief, but he also has a place in the plot line.

It's also a good idea to note that Lucio accompanies Isabella to appeal the release of her brother to Angelo. While Isabella pleads for Claudio's life out of sisterly love, she also can't help but to agree with Angelo that what Claudio did was wrong. Therefore, Isabelle f... Read more

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89 out of 92 people found this helpful

IMPORTANT CORRECTION Concerning Isabella

by Toulgoat, May 05, 2013

Correction: Isabella is not unfailingly virtuous.

Claudio asks Lucio to acquaint Isabella with his fate that she might persuade Angelo for, "in her youth/There is a prone and speechless dialect/Such as move men; beside, she hath prosperous art/When she will play with reason and discourse,/And well she can persuade" [1.2.179-83]. Though Claudio's last remark makes allusion of her astute ability to bend words, it is also used in juxtaposition with her "speechless dialect/Such as move men," referring to sex; Claudio is inferring that Is... Read more

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