Antonyms
Antonyms
One of the milestones of language acquisition is the discovery that things in the world actually have opposites—not just nouns like day and night but also verbs like push and pull and adjectives like rich and poor. Soon after making this discovery, kids find themselves paraded as geniuses by proud parents showing them off to anyone who will listen. “Up,” the parents would say, to which the child would dutifully respond “down.” This jaw-dropping linguistic display would inevitably be followed by classics like in and out and high and low, much to the amazement of the audience. What would really be a neat trick would be if the parents said “obdurate” and the kid responded “compliant.” Flashing forward twenty odd years, GRE Antonym questions give you the opportunity to reprise your role as Master of Opposites—except this time no one’s applauding. Knocking back these nine or so questions interspersed throughout the Verbal section will, however, help you get into grad school, which should be reward enough.
Antonym questions test not only your vocabulary but also your ability to reason from a concept to its opposite. So while a solid vocabulary is the most important factor in success, a bit of logic comes into play as well. As always, we’ll get things started with an X-ray.
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