Arms and the Man

by: George Bernard Shaw

Act Two, continued

Summary Act Two, continued

Raina’s behavior on seeing Bluntschli in her house again is especially striking. She cannot keep herself from remarking that he is “the chocolate cream soldier.” She does this because she is so surprised to see him again, but she is clearly flustered, which signals that she could be falling for him. For Raina, Sergius, and Petkoff, the mess of war disrupted their normal life. Battles occur outside the house. Bluntschli’s initial intrusion into the bedroom, as a solider on the lam, quite literally brought war into the home. Raina has to face the unromantic facts of war delivered by Bluntschli, but his presence also introduces the prospect of another romantic interest into Raina’s life. Seeing Bluntschli again brings back that initial shock, and makes plain that, although the war is finished in the fields, the romantic complexities hinged on that war are not yet over.