Henry IV, Part 1

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 1 Scene 2

page Act 1 Scene 2 Page 7

Original Text

Modern Text

PRINCE HENRY

I care not.

PRINCE HENRY

I don’t care.

POINS

Sir John, I prithee, leave the Prince and me alone. I will lay him down such reasons for this adventure that he shall go.

POINS

Sir John, do me a favor: leave me and the Prince alone. I’ll spell out such good reasons for this adventure, he’s sure to join.

FALSTAFF

Well, God give thee the spirit of persuasion, and him the ears of profiting, that what thou speakest may move, and what he hears may be believed, that the true prince may, for recreation sake, prove a false thief, for the poor abuses of the time want countenance. Farewell. You shall find me in Eastcheap.

FALSTAFF

May God give you the power of persuasion and him the good sense to listen, so that what you say will affect him and what he hears will sink in. This way, the true prince will turn into false thief, just for laughs. After all, all the poor, little vices of the age need encouragement. So long; you’ll find me in Eastcheap.

PRINCE HENRY

135Farewell, thou latter spring. Farewell, All-hallown summer.

PRINCE HENRY

Exit FALSTAFF
FALSTAFF exits.

POINS

Now, my good sweet honey lord, ride with us tomorrow. I have a jest to execute that I cannot manage alone. Falstaff, Peto, Bardolph, and Gadshill shall rob those men that we have already waylaid. Yourself and I will not be there. And when they have the booty, if you and I do not rob them, cut this head off from my shoulders.

POINS

Now, my good sweet honey sir, come with us tomorrow. I have an idea for a practical joke, and I can’t do it by myself. Falstaff, Peto, Bardolph, and Mr. Gadshill will rob the travelers we’re planning to ambush, but you and I won’t be there. If you and I don’t rob them once they have the loot, then chop off my head!

PRINCE HENRY

How shall we part with them in setting forth?

PRINCE HENRY

But we’re all planning to leave together. How will you and I separate ourselves?

POINS

Why, we will set forth before or after them, and appoint them a place of meeting, wherein it is at our pleasure to fail; and then will they adventure upon the exploit themselves, which they shall have no sooner achieved but we’ll set upon them.

POINS

We’ll leave before them, or after them. We’ll tell them to meet us someplace, but then we won’t show up. They’ll pull off the robbery by themselves, and the second they’ve done it, we’ll attack them.

PRINCE HENRY

Yea, but ’tis like that they will know us by our horses, by our habits, and by every other appointment to be ourselves.

PRINCE HENRY

Sure, but they’ll recognize our horses, our clothes, and all our other things.