The Taming of the Shrew

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 1

page Act 4 Scene 1 Page 3

Original Text

Modern Text

CURTIS

All ready. And therefore, I pray thee, news.

CURTIS

Everything’s ready. So tell me what’s been going on.

GRUMIO

First, know my horse is tired, my master and mistress fallen out.

GRUMIO

Well, first of all, my horse is tired and my master and mistress have had a falling out.

CURTIS

How?

CURTIS

How?

GRUMIO

Out of their saddles into the dirt, and thereby hangs a tale.

GRUMIO

From their saddles into the dirt—but that’s another story.

CURTIS

20Let’s ha' ’t, good Grumio.

CURTIS

Well, let’s have it, Grumio.

GRUMIO

Lend thine ear.

GRUMIO

Lean forward.

CURTIS

Here.

CURTIS

Here.

GRUMIO

There!

GRUMIO

There!
Strikes him
GRUMIO strikes CURTIS.

CURTIS

This ’tis to feel a tale, not to hear a tale.

CURTIS

This is to feel the news, not hear it.

GRUMIO

25And therefore ’tis called a sensible tale. And this cuff was but to knock at your ear and beseech list'ning. Now I begin: Imprimis, we came down a foul hill, my master riding behind my mistress—

GRUMIO

That’s what makes it “sensitive” news. I was just knocking to see if anyone was home. Now, I’ll begin: first, we came down a steep hill, my master riding behind my mistress—

CURTIS

Both of one horse?

CURTIS

Both on one horse?

GRUMIO

What’s that to thee?

GRUMIO

What’s the difference?