The Two Gentlemen of Verona

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 1 Scene 2

page Act 1 Scene 2 Page 3

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LUCETTA

To plead for love deserves more fee than hate.

LUCETTA

A request for your love deserves more in return than your hatred.

JULIA

Will ye be gone?

JULIA

Will you get going?

LUCETTA

50That you may ruminate.

LUCETTA

Just think about it.
Exit
LUCETTA exits.

JULIA

And yet I would I had o’erlooked the letter.
It were a shame to call her back again
And pray her to a fault for which I chid her.
What fool is she, that knows I am a maid
55And would not force the letter to my view!
Since maids, in modesty, say no to that
Which they would have the profferer construe ay.
Fie, fie, how wayward is this foolish love
That, like a testy babe, will scratch the nurse
60And presently, all humbled, kiss the rod!
How churlishly I chid Lucetta hence,
When willingly I would have had her here!
How angerly I taught my brow to frown,
When inward joy enforced my heart to smile!
65My penance is to call Lucetta back
And ask remission for my folly past.
What ho! Lucetta!

JULIA

Then again, I wish I had read the letter. It would be embarrassing to call her back again and do the very thing I chided her for. How foolish she is, since she knows I’m a single girl but still wouldn’t make me read it! Out of modesty girls say “no” when they wish the giver would construe it as “yes.” How difficult this foolish thing called love is, like a cranky baby that will scratch its nurse and then immediately after show affection. How rudely I scolded Lucetta, when really I wanted her here. I’ve taught myself to appear angry even when my heart smiles with joy! My punishment is to call Lucetta back and ask forgiveness for my mistake. Hey, Lucetta!
Enter LUCETTA
LUCETTA enters.

LUCETTA

What would your ladyship?

LUCETTA

What would you like, my lady?

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