Fences

by: August Wilson

Act One: Scene Three

Cory sees the present for what it is, a changing, gradually more accepting place for talented blacks like himself, but Troy can only see the present as he experienced his hardest disappointments in the past. Troy's unwillingness to change his perceptions with the time, results in his stubborn and selfish decision to refuse to see the college recruiter coming to ask for Troy's permission to recruit Cory for college football. Troy and Cory's incompatible perspectives and conflicting interpretation of a changing history comprise their major differences. Cory gets a startlingly sour taste of Troy's irrational hypocrisy. Troy's hypocrisy favors his own warped vision of the world as one he can shape for his own protection at the expense of holding back a promising future for his son, who he believes he is also protecting, but instead, actually holds back.