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The Clouds

Aristophanes

Quiz

Study Questions and Suggested Essay Topics

Suggestions for Further Reading

Why does Strepsiades wake up in the middle of the night?

What is Pheidippides's expensive hobby?

Who wanted to name Pheidippides after horses?

What does Strepsiades think the sophists consider the sky?

What are the students at the "Thinkery" studying when they bend over?

When Strepsiades asks Pheidippides to change his expensive ways, by whom does he swear first?

By whom does Pheidippides swear second?

What insects does the Student say that Socrates and Chaerephon are studying?

According to Socrates, who causes the rain?

What does Socrates steal from Strepsiades?

In the "parabasis," the Chorus speaks on behalf of Aristophanes, calling him what?

What does Socrates call a male chicken?

What does Socrates call a female chicken?

What does Socrates call a female trough?

Where does Socrates demand that Strepsiades go in order to properly think and philosophize?

When he is fresh out of the "Thinkery," what is the first argument Pheidippides has?

What does Strepsiades demand of the First Creditor?

What does Strepsiades ask the Second Creditor?

Whom does Pheidippides beat?

What does Strepsiades wish to hear recited at dinner?

How does Strepsiades take his revenge?

What two philosophers reside at the "Thinkery"?

Who helps Strepsiades burn down the school?

The Athenians based their calendar on what natural occurrence?

Just and Unjust Argument debate over what?

More Help

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'Fair is foul,and foul is fair,

by Shehanaz, June 11, 2013

“Man is not the creature of circumstances
Circumstances are the creatures of man.”
Macbeth, throughout the play, is presented as one much above the ordinary beings, and, as such, he fulfils the basic -requirements of being a tragic hero. Shakespeare, introduces him as a brave general, a bold, resolute man of action who through as also referred to “Valor’s minion”, “Bellona’s bridegroom’’, the king’s ‘’valiant cousin’’, a very “eagle’’ among ‘’sparrows’’, a ... Read more

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7 out of 10 people found this helpful

'Fair is foul,and foul is fair,

by Shehanaz, June 11, 2013

“Man is not the creature of circumstances
Circumstances are the creatures of man.”
Macbeth, throughout the play, is presented as one much above the ordinary beings, and, as such, he fulfils the basic -requirements of being a tragic hero. Shakespeare, introduces him as a brave general, a bold, resolute man of action who through as also referred to “Valor’s minion”, “Bellona’s bridegroom’’, the king’s ‘’valiant cousin’’, a very “eagle’’ among ‘’sparrows’’, a ... Read more

0 Comments

3 out of 3 people found this helpful

Hover through the fog and filthy air.'

by Shehanaz, June 11, 2013

The forces of evil are always ready to ensnare man, but they have their limitations. They do not, indeed cannot, force man into evil; they can merely tempt man to choose to follow evil ways. Experiencing temptation is not sinful, but deliberately choosing to give in to temptation is an evil.
[“Have I not reason, beldams as you are,
Saucy and over-bold? How did you dare
To trade and traffic with Macbeth
In riddles and affairs of death?”] (HECATE SCENE, Act 3, SCENE 5)

Macbeth deliberately chooses-not once bu

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4 out of 4 people found this helpful

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