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Spirited Away

Character and Setting

The Death of an Art Form

Directing

The artists behind Spirited Away paid close attention to the consistency of setting and character and the relationship between them. Yubaba has a sense of richness about her even when she’s just sitting in a towel with a simple white turban wrapped around her head. Chihiro, even when she is Sen, always appears plain and straightforward, from her ponytail to her humble clothing. She works in the elaborately appointed bathhouse, but the background always suggests simplicity and quiet. In spite of the lushness of the bathhouse, Sen must clean the big tub that sits alone in a nearly bare room. In that room she transforms a huge, ungainly, polluted spirit into the essence of simplicity: First he appears as a skeletal head, then as a sleek serpent. Even her meals are simple affairs. She nibbles a dumpling on her balcony far from the multi-course hubbub of the main house. The scenery, which tends to be of secondary importance in animated films, is as impressive as any exquisitely filmed landscape in a live-action movie.

The minor characters are rendered just as flawlessly as the setting, with expressions and movements that range from the subtle to the garish. The different techniques the characters use in trying to reach No-Face in the bathhouse make for a powerful contrast. After No-Face becomes the rich, gold-making spirit, the assistant manager uses exaggerated songs and dances, including a fan dance, to ingratiate himself to No-Face. Later, after No-Face has practically wrecked the bathhouse, Sen confronts him with a still, silent dignity that is profoundly effective.

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An excerpt from Tumblr by cering

by LunarFox, September 10, 2012

I’ve noticed that several of my followers are Miyazaki fans, so I thought I share this little tidbit of information with you about Spirited Away.

I always wondered why the symbol “ゆ” (said “yu”) was on the door to the bath house. I asked my Japanese teacher, and he wasn’t too sure so I did a little research.

The symbol is used on the entrance to 温泉 (onsen) and 銭湯 (sento), or Japanese bath houses. The word “yu” is translated to “hot water”. So, makes sense to be on a bath house, yes?

Then I d... Read more

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About Haku and Chihiro

by bbluecheese, April 25, 2013

Although this page puts it that Chihiro and Haku share a purely platonic, brother/sister love, this is not true. For one thing, it just doesn't seem like it in the movie. For another, and more importantly, when the movie is played in Chinese, the boiler man (or Zeniba, I forget who) refers to Haku as Chihiro's 男朋友 which means boyfriend. So definitely, romantic relationship there.

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5 out of 7 people found this helpful

The train

by MadClairvoyant, September 15, 2013

I always wondered why Kamaji told Chihiro that the train used to go two ways, yet it only goes one way now. He could have just told her that it goes one way, right?

Does the conjecture; the train symbolises going to the afterlife, and that our lack of belief has caused it to become a one way trip, make sense?

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2 out of 2 people found this helpful

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