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Doctor Faustus

Christopher Marlowe

Contents

Suggestions for Further Reading

Suggestions for Further Reading

Suggestions for Further Reading

Suggestions for Further Reading

Suggestions for Further Reading

Suggestions for Further Reading

Bloom, Harold. Christopher Marlowe. New York: Chelsea House, 1986.

Farnham, Willard. Twentieth-Century Interpretations of Doctor Faustus . Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall, 1969.

Greenblatt, Stephen. Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980.

Maclure, Millar, ed. Marlowe: The Critical Heritage. Boston: Routledge, 1979.

Marlowe, Christopher. Doctor Faustus. Ed. Sylvan Barnet. New York: Signet, 2001.

Sales, Roger. Christopher Marlowe. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991.

Tydeman, William. Doctor Faustus : Text and Performance. Basingstoke, England: Macmillan, 1984.

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a personal view

by salesman5, September 13, 2013

I think we should not blame this ambitious man because everyone has a " Faustasian Approach " to some extent. some succeed to restrain their inner wishes while other, like Fuastus , do not .

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4 out of 6 people found this helpful

Discuss the character of Doctor Faustus.

by touhidsm, May 24, 2014

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http://josbd.com/Doctor_Faustus.html

Answer: Dr. Faustus, the main character of the story, is a professor of divinity at Wittenberg, as well as a renowned physician and scholar. Not satisfied with the limitations of human knowledge and power, he begins to practice necromancy. He eventually makes a deal with Lucifer (commonly referred to as the "Faustian bargain"), whereby he exchanges his soul for twenty-four years of the devil’s ... Read more

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79 out of 86 people found this helpful

Discuss Doctor Faustus as a man of Renaissance.

by touhidsm, May 27, 2014

Read the full answer at >>

http://josbd.com/Doctor_Faustus_1.html


Answer: Faustus’s inexhaustible thirst for knowledge , his worship of beauty , his passion for the classics , his skepticism , his interest in sorcery and magic , his admiration of Machiavelli and super –human ambition and will in the pursuit of ideals of beauty or power, prove him to be a man of renaissance.

Faustus appears as a man of the Renaissance in the very opening scene when... Read more

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30 out of 33 people found this helpful

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